Secondary School Policies and Procedures


CODE OF CONDUCT

CISE adheres to the guiding principles of the Ontario’s Schools Code of Conduct. All members of the school community – students, staff members, parents and volunteers – are included in this Code of Conduct whether they are on school property, on buses during an educational outing or at school-authorized events or activities. All members are to be treated with respect and dignity and are expected to use non-violent means to resolve conflict.

The Principal provides the leadership by:

  • demonstrating care and commitment to academic excellence and a safe and orderly teaching and learning environment;
  • holding everyone accountable for his/her behaviour and actions;
  • communicating regularly and meaningfully with all members of the school community.

The Staff Members maintain order in the school and are expected to hold everyone to the highest standard of respectful and responsible behaviour. As role models, staff uphold these high standards when they:

  • help and encourage students to work to their potential and develop their self-worth;
  • communicate regularly and meaningfully with parents;
  • set a positive tone in the school;
  • maintain consistent standards of behaviour and language for all students in their classroom and the whole school;
  • treat students and their concerns in a consistent, fair and courteous manner;
  • demonstrate respect for all students, other staff members and parents;
  • prepare students for the full responsibilities of citizenship.

Students are to be treated with respect and dignity. In return, they must demonstrate respect for themselves, for others, and for the staff. These responsibilities are demonstrated when a student:

  • comes to school regularly, on time and ready to learn;
  • is prepared for all classes by bringing required material and completing homework assignments well and on time;
  • is responsible for any work missed in classes due to absence;
  • shows respect for themselves, for others and for those in authority;
  • develops self-discipline and shows courtesy through language and actions toward all members of the school community;
  • shows respect for school property and the personal belongings of others;
  • cooperates with other members of the school community;
  • resolves interpersonal conflicts and difficulties through discussions with the other person or through seeking assistance from school personnel;
  • refrains from bringing anything to school that may compromise the safety of others (e.g., alcohol, illegal drugs, weapons, chemicals, objects which may be used as weapons);
  • follows the established rules and takes responsibility for his or her own action.

Parents expect that staff members will act as positive role models for students and will treat each one in a fair and consistent manner. Parents play an important role in the education of their children and have a responsibility to support the efforts of school staff in maintaining a safe and respectful learning environment for all students. Parents fulfill this responsibility when they:

  • show an active interest in their child’s school work and progress;
  • provide a suitable environment for regular homework and ensure that their child completes school assignments and prepares for the next day’s work;
  • communicate regularly with the school;
  • attempt to attend school events and meetings and give constructive input and support to school;
  • encourage their child to be appropriately dressed and prepared for school;
  • ensure that their child attends school regularly and on time;
  • promptly report to the school their child’s absence or late arrival;
  • become familiar with the Code of Conduct and school rules;
  • encourage and assist their child in following the rules of behaviour and language;
  • assist school staff in dealing with disciplinary issues.

INTERVENTIONS & CONSEQUENCES

CISE students, staff and parents work in partnership to create a positive educational environment based on trust, responsible decision-making and self-discipline. Interventions and consequences will be logical, rational and consistent depending on the behaviour, its seriousness, and its frequency. Interventions and consequences will be reflective and progressive and may include: temporary removal from class, referral to the Administration and/or Student Success Teacher, assignation of detention(s), in-school suspension, and/or suspension. There will be no tolerance for violence, bullying or harassment, robbery, vandalism to school property, the use or possession or trafficking of illegal drugs or alcohol. Incidents that involve threats, profanity, physical harm, fighting or other serious behaviours will be dealt with promptly and severely. Suspension or expulsion from school may result.

Consequences of Inappropriate Behaviour

Detention/ Removal from class
A detention involves the student reporting to the Principal’s office during the student’s lunch time. If the student’s behavior, attitude or language is disruptive to the learning environment, he/she will be removed from class. The student may be asked to fill out a “Student Incident Report” indicating what the problem was, his/her action, how it affected the learning environment and how to solve it the next time. An SMS message will be sent to parents to indicate this has occurred.
In –School Suspension

As part of progressive discipline, an in school suspension may be applied. The student will not return to his/her regular class but will be expected to complete his/her work in a designated, supervised area. The family will be contacted and may be required to attend a meeting as soon thereafter as possible.

Out of School Suspension

A suspension involves a student remaining at home during school day(s) for the period of the suspension. The student is not welcome back at CISE or to attend any school function or to go on any CISE bus until the date of the suspension is over. A parent conference will be a requirement before the student is readmitted to the school.

Expulsion

If a student is considered for expulsion, that is, permanent removal from the school, parents will be contacted to participate in a discussion concerning the matter. If, after that discussion, a decision to expel the student is made, he or she, with parental support, may submit a written appeal of the decision to the Director. The decision of the Director is final.

Following an expulsion all CISE textbooks and borrowed supplies/material must be returned before any official student documents will be released. The school will, within reasonable limits, assist the parents to obtain an alternate school placement for their child.

Academic/ Behavioural Contract and/or Probation

Where necessary, students may be placed on Academic contract, Behavioural contract and/or Probation. These are part of progressive discipline and intended to support students to make better choices and become more responsible, accountable, organized, and\or successful. Contracts may be period specific or for the full day as determined by need and the Student Success Teacher. Parents will be notified and required to sign the contract on a weekly basis. Failure to comply with the expectations will result in further consequences.

Discipline Policy

CISE operates under a progressive discipline policy. Progressive discipline includes: discussion / reflection, loss of privilege, detention – lunch / after school, parent contact, in-school suspension, home suspension, parent meeting, academic / behaviour contracts, expulsion.

1) Behaviour / Academic Issues: (depending on severity of issue, teacher is expected to have tried at least 3 intervention strategies before a student is referred to the office)

– Once a student is removed from class, they do not return to that class until the next day at the earliest.

– 2nd issue (behaviour, incomplete homework, etc.) = detention

– Next 4 issues = in-school suspension

– Next 4 issues = out of school suspension

– Suspensions to be followed by parent re-entry meetings

– First re-entry meeting with parent will involve a student contract

– All issues are texted to parent

– Nature of behaviour issue can increase the progressive discipline

– Detention = ½ hour at lunch; no show = after school detention; no show after school = suspension unless it is agreed that the detention will be served the next day.

– Thereafter 4 issues = doubled out of school suspension

2) Punctuality Issues:

– 4 issues = detention

– 4 detentions = in-school suspension

– 4 more issues = parent meeting and out of school suspension.

3) Attendance Issues:

– Unexplained absence = detention

– 2 unexplained absences = in-school suspension

– If this cycle repeats 2 times = parent meeting and out of school suspension.

Progressive discipline will be applied in the above and any other situations where the student’s choice is contrary to the school’s code of conduct and expectations (e.g. Uniform, bus behaviour, facilities use, academic honesty, etc.)

THE SCHOOL DAY

The school day begins at 8:15 a.m. and ends at 3:00 p.m. The structure of the regular school day is as follows:

Period One: 8:15 – 9:45

Period Two:  9:50 – 11:15

Lunch:     11:15 – 12:05

Period Three:  12:05 – 01:30

Period Four:  1:35 – 3:00

Students are not to arrive at school before 8:00 a.m. There is no supervision prior to that time.

Students being picked up by car are to be picked up no later than 3:15 p.m. except for those days when the student is involved in after-school activities. On those days appropriate arrangements need to be made for pick up. Students must remain on school campus until the driver arrives and then must leave the school area promptly. Students are expected to be on the bus and in their assigned seats by 3:10 p.m.

STUDENT AGENDAS

The CISE student agendas are important communication vehicles. These are useful time management tools and we encourage their use.

ATTENDANCE

Regular attendance is critical for students’ learning and achievement of course expectations. The Education Act requires that all students attend classes punctually and regularly. School activities commence at 8:15 a.m. All students are expected to be present in their assigned classroom, ready to begin their day at that time. Attendance is taken at the commencement of the school day. If a student is absent and the school has not been notified, the parents will be phoned to check that they are aware of the student’s absence from school and to inquire about the nature of the absence. These calls are made out of concern for the safety and security of the students. To assist the school in providing security for the children, parents are asked to notify the school if their child is going to be away. A written note to the teacher, a note in the student’s agenda or a phone call to the Secondary Office in advance, is requested. In the case of an extended absence, please inform the school of your child’s planned return date. This will minimize concerns at the school and eliminate unnecessary phone calls to verify the absence of a student. Also, if appropriate, arrangements can be made to provide the student with school work during that absence. Where, in the Principal’s judgment, a student’s frequent absences from school are jeopardizing his or her successful completion of a course, staff will communicate with the student and parents to explain the potential consequences of the absences, including failure to gain a credit. Steps will be discussed that could be taken to improve student attendance.

SCHOOL ARRIVALS AND DEPARTURES

Secondary School Late Arrival Procedures

If a student arrives at school after the start time in the morning or after the start time in the afternoon, he/she must report to the Secondary Office. Each late student will be given a late slip explaining to their teacher the reason for the lateness. However, if a student is away in the morning and comes back during the noon break period, he/she can go directly to his/her next class .The teacher will account for his/her return in the daily attendance control system. All parents are asked to put forth a concerted effort to ensure punctuality. Repeated lates will result in progressive discipline consequences.

Parents Visiting the School

As CISE grows, it is increasingly difficult to ensure student safety without more stringent control of access to the school. Parents entering the school during the school day must sign in at the security office, present appropriate identification and receive a visitor pass prior to entering the school. Parents should then report their presence to the front foyer Reception desk. If a parent wishes to meet with a teacher, Principal, or Vice-Principal, it is necessary to make an appointment in advance. Appointments with teachers during the teaching day are difficult to arrange and will only be considered in extraordinary circumstances.

Leaving School during the School Day

Students who must leave the school early for an appointment or special event must be picked up by the parents or by a driver or other adult with the parent’s written permission and signed out at the Secondary Office. In a semestered school system each instructional day is important. We request that you schedule appointments for after school to minimize disruption to your child’s learning.

Leaving the School Grounds

Students are not allowed to leave the school grounds at any time during the day unless on a supervised school activity or with parental permission. Students who are picked up by drivers at the end of the school day must stay on school property until their drivers arrive.

Students who must leave the school grounds during school hours, for a specific reason, must bring written permission from their parents to the Secondary Office.

Non-registered Student Visitation

Non-registered students may visit CISE with their parents after making an appointment with an administrator or a member of the office staff. Students and parents are more than welcome to visit CISE and will be accompanied by a staff representative during this visit, so a pre-arrangement is necessary. If a CISE student wishes to arrange a school visit for a friend to see what CISE is like, the visiting student’s parents must contact the Secondary Office in order to make an appointment.

HOMEWORK AND ASSIGNMENT COMPLETION

Punctual attendance and a readiness to work with the required materials brought to class are expected. Each student will do his/her best to complete all assignments on time. Each student will complete all homework assignments and prepare for tests in a diligent manner. Emergencies will arise and teachers will be respectful of this. Consistency of effort is a worthy goal. In the event of an excused and/or extended absence, it is the student’s responsibility to approach and work with his/her teachers to acquire any missed instruction and assignments. Refer to the school’s Late and Missed Assignment Policy and Academic Dishonesty Policy regarding the submission of assignments.

UNIFORM

The CISE school uniform consists of the school shirt, the school sweater and school uniform trousers. (Track pants and tights/leggings are not acceptable.) All students must be in uniform on the bus, the school grounds, and during excursions. Students need to understand that proper dress is a significant school expectation and any effort to ignore express standards in this regard will not be accepted.

  • Parental support of the CISE uniform is essential. If a student comes to school without a uniform or wearing an unacceptable item of clothing, parents will be informed. Students will be referred to the uniform store to purchase the appropriate article to correct their uniform. Continuous disregard for the school uniform may result in a suspension.
  • CISE may on occasion host ‘Special Dress Days’ during holidays, festivals, sports days, etc. where the school uniform is not required. These must be prearranged and agreed upon in advance by the appropriate Principal. Students will be notified in advance of this date.
  • Uniforms are to be purchased at the school Uniform Shop. It is important to ensure that sufficient pants/shorts, shirts and/or T-shirts are on hand at home. There should be no excuse for uniforms not being worn due to being laundered. It is the parents’ responsibility to have uniform pants shortened.
  • Any modifications to the school uniform for reasons of faith must be discussed and approved on an individual basis with the Administration.
  • Hats are not to be worn inside the school.
  • Students are expected to come to school clean and well-groomed.Excessive expressions of individuality such as coloured hair or body piercings are not appropriate for this school and will require a discussion with the administration.

We endeavour to provide a variety of sizes of uniforms. There have been a few incidences when a student cannot find a suitable size. When this occurs the student is to discuss the problem with the Principal. The Principal will outline in writing the next steps.

Parent-Teacher Communications

All teachers will communicate with parents regularly concerning student progress, performance expectations, behaviour and other matters. Strategies for effective Parent/Teacher communication include:

  1. Parent-Teacher-Student Conferences;
  2. Calls home;
  3. E-mail;
  4. Agendas – provided by the school;
  5. Individual meetings, in person, by appointment, usually scheduled after school;

 

  1. Meetings with a member of the school’s Administration. Parents must meet with the classroom teacher before requesting a meeting with the Principal;
  2. SMS;
  3. Facebook

Parents are encouraged to follow the school Twitter feed for updates and school news.

In order to maintain communication, it is important to keep our office updated with any changes to mobile numbers and/or email addresses.

In September we have a Curriculum Nights for parents. Teachers will give information about classroom expectations and what will be taught in each of the subjects.

Moodle Class Webpage: Teachers post curriculum updates, upcoming events, assignments and homework on the class’s webpage linked through the school’s website. It is a secured class site where only the students and parents from the classroom can view the information.

To enhance teacher–parent communication, the school has four mobile phones available for teachers to use to call parents. These phones are also taken by the teacher when students are on field trips. The phones are for out-going calls only, and will not be answered. The mobile number is:

  • 010 122 46518

To contact a teacher please use the school’s main numbers and leave a message with the office staff.

Notes:

  1. Please remember that parent-teacher or Principal-parent meetings are by appointment only. Parents are asked not to arrive without an appointment, as it will not be possible to accommodate an interview with a teacher since the teacher will be with his/her class or involved in student supervision. Also, unscheduled meetings do not allow the school staff participants to be properly prepared for the important discussions which make such meetings productive.
  2. It is CISE policy to decline to provide parents with personal teacher contact information such as personal e-mail addresses, home mobile numbers and home addresses.

Transportation

Transportation – General

Bus transportation to and from school is available to most students although the school does reserve the right to decline to provide transportation to students whose residence is sufficiently remote from the school to make efficient pick-up, drop-off and travel times. If there are safety issues about the bus and its driver please contact the school. The transportation fee is set at the beginning of the year.

  • Students are expected to follow the bus rules and respect the instructions of the bus monitor.
  • Students are expected to be punctual for buses.Buses cannot wait or return for tardy students in the morning.Students who miss their bus at the end of the day will have to call their parents and make alternate arrangements to get home.
  • Students may only travel on the bus to which they are assigned.Switching buses creates security concerns and will not be allowed. Please do not ask.

Students are expected to follow these simple bus safety rules:

  1. Remain seated in your assigned place while on the bus;
  2. Keep hands, feet and head away from windows and doors;
  3. Use appropriate language;
  4. Behave responsibly – every student deserves a safe and happy ride;
  5. Follow the directions of the Bus Monitors at all times;
  6. Students will be allowed to have a snack on the bus from 3:00-3:10pm before the buses leave the school grounds; and
  7. Any damage to the school bus caused by a student(s) will be charged to the student(s).

Being transported by school bus is a privilege. Students who consistently ignore bus rules will follow progressive discipline consequences.

Activity Buses

Late buses are provided so that students can participate in teacher supervised activities such as After School Activities and team sports. Only students registered by a teacher for an activity team will be given access to late buses. Late buses are restricted to students whose parents have paid transportation fees. The late buses will leave the school at approximately 4:45 p.m.

Private Drivers

When students are transported to school privately, parents are required to:

  • complete a form with the name of the driver and other contact information;
  • notify the school in writing, if a change of driver is to take place;

The Driver will:

  • be issued with a “Pick Up Card” which must be available to security.
  • wait outside the school;
  • drop off students between 8:00 and 8:10 a.m.; pick up students between 3:05 – 3:15 p.m.

Gates:

  • Secondary students use Gate 4 only. Secondary students only use the main gate when arriving or departing during the school day.

If a student is to travel in a car other than with his/her designated driver, She/he must give the Principal a letter signed by parents before lunch. When being transported by car, the number of people in the car must not exceed the number of seat belts.

These procedures are in place for the security and safety of individual students.

Bus Students who occasionally Go Home by Car:

Parents are to notify the school in writing of any changes and clearly indicate who will be picking up the student and at what time. In the event of an emergency please contact the Secondary Office. Requests for changes must be made before 12:00 p.m.

USE OF ELECTRONICS/TECHNOLOGY

CISE has internet connection to support learning. The school is equipped with land and wireless internet connection. All school computer use must support education for classroom activities and/or professional or career development. The school supports only the ethical and legal utilization of technology and internet resources. The smoother operation of the network is dependent upon appropriate use. All users will adhere to the following expectations:

  • CISE has the right to monitor all electronic communication.
  • Users will not transmit, relay or receive information or materials that are inappropriate and/or unlawful.
  • If a user unintentionally accesses unacceptable materials, he/she must report this to the supervising teacher direction.
  • Users will familiarize themselves with and respect copyright laws and licensing agreements.
  • Use of electronic media such as email, chat rooms, blogs, social networking sites, etc. without a specific identified task/focus/issue is inappropriate.
  • Vandalism and/or the unauthorized use of non-school hardware or software on the network environment are prohibited
  • All other expectations outlined in the Technology and Internet Policy in the Parent Handbook

Computer Misuse and Consequences

If there are any misuse of CISE’s computer policy one or more of the following consequences may result:

  • suspension or cancellation of use of access privileges;
  • payments for damages and repairs;
  • discipline under other appropriate school policies, including suspension or even expulsion;
  • Civil or criminal prosecution under applicable Egyptian law.

Should an infraction occur, the school Administration may immediately revoke user privileges. Any user identified as a security risk or as having a history of problems with other computer systems may be denied access to CISE’s computer system.

Students are required to transfer files to the school as e-mail attachments. No work is to be transferred from home to the CISE computer network by portable memory devices such as flash memory as this practice puts the integrity of the school’s computer system at risk.

Electronic Devices (examples: Mobiles; Laptops; iPads; iPods; Cameras)

It is expected that all students are engaged in the learning and instruction in the classroom. All electronic devices must be put away and inaccessible during class time to avoid distraction to self and others. Students must have permission from their teacher to use any electronic devices during class time. Misuse may result in disciplinary action. In addition, if a student chooses to bring any personal electronics to school the item(s) are his/her responsibility. The school does not accept responsibility for any loss, theft or damage. Students are encouraged to ensure their belongings are not left unattended and are secured safely. Students are not allowed to take pictures of other students, staff or teachers unless they are given specific permission to take pictures for a particular assignment or project. Teachers will outline the rules for taking any pictures during the school day. Students must receive permission from any staff member and/or student before their picture is taken.

If a student is seen using an electronic device such as a camera, mobile, etc. without permission, the student will be asked to give it to the Principal. The item can be collected by the student at 3:00. If this is repeated, the item may be held in the school safe until the end of the week and/or until a parent comes to the school to retrieve it.

SAFETY & VALUABLES

Anything of value to the student should not be brought to school. Objects such as mp3 players, video games, mobile phones and cameras are not needed at school and ideally should be left at home. While every effort will be made to monitor student activity, the school cannot be responsible for lost or stolen items.

Failure by a student to respect this requirement may result in the phone’s confiscation. The same expectation will apply to personal entertainment devices such as iPads and iPods.

Mobile phones are not to be used during school hours or anywhere on the school campus without permission.

Parents are not to call students during the school day. In the event of an emergency or a message needs to be given, call the Main Office and CISE office staff will ensure the student receives the message.

LOCKERS

Lockers are available for student use. Students are encouraged to use lockers to store their belongings in a safe, secure place and to keep themselves organized. Students are responsible for locking their locker to ensure this security. Students are not to leave their bags in the hallways, corridors or stair wells.

ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS

Students are expected, through co-operation with their teachers and their own efforts, to maintain an appropriate level of academic accomplishment. Failure to do so in the absence of justifiable circumstances will have significant consequences.

CISE’s expectation for students is to maintain a minimum average of 65% (Level 2) as determined by their teachers based on the school’s usual evaluation practices.

When a student’s average falls below the required minimum or he or she gets two or more failing grades in a semester, he or she will be placed on academic probation. If the student does not improve his or her performance to meet the minimum level of academic accomplishment in the next term or the Principal will meet with the student and parents to consider whether the student can remain at CISE. At that meeting, all circumstances related to the student’s academic situation will be reviewed. Thereafter, the Principal will decide if the student can continue at CISE or is to be demitted.

If the Principal’s decision is that the student is to be demitted, that decision may be appealed to the school’s Director. That decision will be final.

If the student is allowed to remain at CISE, the Principal will determine the expectations of the school for the student and his/her parents and all concerned will be obliged to sign a performance contract which will specify those expectations. That contract will also express a timeframe within which the student is to correct his/her academic situation or be demitted.

During the period of the contract the school will provide all reasonable supports to the student and his family in an effort to achieve a successful outcome.

Field Trips

Field trips are organized to enrich the students’ experience of the school curriculum. These are valuable experiences related to one or more of the school’s academic programs. All students are expected to participate in these educational outings subject to the following requirements:

  1. Students must have their parents sign appropriate field trip forms indicating parental consent, in order to be allowed to participate in field trips.Permission given over the phone is not sufficient;
  2. If students arrive at school on the day of a field trip without their signed field trip form, they will be offered an alternative program if that is possible or asked to work independently in the library. For younger students it may be necessary to ask parents to take them home for the day;
  3. All students must wear their school uniform on field trips unless an exception has been approved by Administration;
  4. Students whose behaviour at school has been consistently inappropriate may not be permitted to participate in field trips at the discretion of the Principal.

School Facilities

Care of CISE Facilities and Resources

CISE’s ownership has invested substantially in the school’s facilities. All students are expected to respect and use the facilities with utmost care. Mistreatment or misuse of the facility or equipment may result in a suspension. Astudent will be expected to pay for any equipment he or she has damaged willfully­. The student will not receive his or her report card or diploma until the required payment has been made.

The Auditorium, Cafeteria, Gymnasium, Library, Computer Lab, and Science Laboratory are important areas in our school. All students are expected to respect and use the equipment in these areas appropriately and to help others to do the same. This means students will:

  • treat all facilities and equipment with care;
  • ensure tidiness and organization of each facility after use, (e.g., placing equipment back in order);
  • consume food in the Cafeteria only;
  • place any garbage in the proper receptacles;
  • make use of facilities only with a teacher present.

Care of Textbooks, Books, Library Books and School Items

Students must return all textbooks, books, library books and school items in good condition. Otherwise, the parent will have to pay the replacement cost. The library and textbook deposit fee is used for any outstanding school resource when a student is permanently leaving the school.

Library

The Library is to be used for research and reading for pleasure. All students are invited to take advantage of the Library’s materials and services. An impressive selection of books, periodicals and electronic resources facilitates the learning of students. Students may use these materials in the Library or sign out books and return them in good condition by the due date. Students must return these materials in a timely fashion. Lost or damaged books/materials will be charged to the student( replacement cost plus shipping costs) and his/her report card will be withheld until the issue is resolved with the Finance Department.

Cafeteria

All students are expected to:
  • treat the facilities, Cafeteria and staff with respect;
  • sit at tables;
  • line-up in an organized fashion;
  • ensure tidiness and organization of the Cafeteria after use (e.g. placing dirty dishes, cutlery away properly);
  • remain seated on chairs while eating;
  • eat with good table manners;
  • talk in a normal tone of voice, with no excessive raising of the voice;

.

Food and drinks (other than water) must be consumed in the cafeteria.

Students must purchase coupons to pay for food. Students must pay cash for these coupons. There are no provisions for credit for food coupons.

Each of our food services providers are committed to delivering, quality meals at reasonable prices. Their efforts are monitored by the Administration and concerns or compliments regarding these services are welcomed.

Prayer Room
  • Shoes are to be removed before entering.
  • The Prayer Room should be left clean after use.
  • Students will not be excused from class to go to the Prayer Room. There are opportunities during students’free time to visit the Prayer Room for prayer and reflection.

Miscellaneous policies

After School Activities

After School activities such as clubs, sports and special projects will begin early in the school year. Examples are Football, Soccer, Basketball, Volleyball, Badminton, Swimming, Homework Club, Drama, Art, Choir, Music, French, Tennis, Chess and Board Games, Floor Hockey and School Plays.

After school sessions will also be designated for extra academic support. These are valuable opportunities for students to improve their academic performance.

Medical Clinic

CISE has a full-time doctor (General Practitioner) on its staff who will attend to all immediate and emergency needs of its students and staff. The doctor compiles and files required medical information about all students and implements a preventive medical program where required. Students are required to have a completed permission form from their teachers to visit the doctor during class time. As necessary, the doctor will contact parents to provide important information. Parents are requested to provide important medical information directly to the Doctor about their child (E.g., allergies, medical condition).

Lost & Found

The Lost and Found is located in the Uniform Shop or Secondary Office. Students are asked to check there first if they have lost anything. Locker use is recommended to prevent loss and/or theft.

Evacuation and Lockdown Drills

Student safety is always of primary importance at CISE. The school practices two types of drills. One is called an Evacuation Drill. This drill is used to empty the school building. All students and staff exit the building in a safe and orderly fashion and assemble on the main soccer field.

The second drill is called a Lockdown Drill. This drill is used to secure all students and staff in classrooms and offices with doors locked. Please note, this is nothing more than another type of safety drill.

All schools in Ontario are required to regularly practice both of these drills. Teachers will explain these drills to all students to prepare them.

Unplanned Early Dismissal Days

There may be times when the school must send students home early due to a situation which causes traffic problems and delays. If we dismiss students 15 minutes early, we do not call parents. For all other times, Monitors will call the parents of students on their buses. For students who go home by car, they will call their parents directly. The message will be also sent by a SMS message and posted on Twitter.

Character Education

Building the character is very important. Each month we will focus on character traits. Students who best demonstrate the character trait will be recognized.

Sept./Oct. Nov./Dec. Jan./Feb. Mar./Apr. May/Jun.
Respect Responsibility Caring Trustworthiness Citizenship

Respect

Ø Treat others with respect • Be tolerant and accepting of differences •Use good manners, do not use bad language • Be considerate of others •Do not threaten, hit or hurt anyone • Deal peacefully with anger, insults and disagreements. Respect the learning environment.

Responsibility

Ø Do what you are supposed to do • Plan ahead • Persevere – keep on trying! • Always do your best • Use self-control • Be self-disciplined • Think before you act – consider your choices • Be accountable for your words, actions and attitudes • Set a good example for others. Demonstrate leadership and accountability. Have excellent attendance and punctuality.

Caring

Ø Be kind • Be compassionate and show you care • Express gratitude • Forgive others • Help people in need • Do not blame others • Listen to others • Work toward community service • Be inclusive • Have a positive attitude.

Trustworthiness

Ø Be honest • Do not deceive, cheat or steal • Be reliable – do what you say you will do • Have the courage to do the right thing • Build a good reputation • Be loyal • Be academically honest • Have zero suspensions • Demonstrate leadership.

Citizenship

Ø Do your share to make your school and community better • Cooperate • Get involved in community and school affairs • Stay informed • Be a good neighbour • Obey laws and rules •Respect authority •Protect the environment • Volunteer • Respect the environment • Include others.

 

School TUITION Fees

CISE, like any private school, relies on the prompt payment of school fees to enjoy good financial health. As a guide, the school’s procedures for the payment of fees in full or by installment are as follows (subject to change with notification):

Returning Students for Academic Year 2015-2016:

*First Instalment:                     10% due by April 30 th, 2015

*Second Instalment:                30% due by August 10th 2015

*Third Instalment:                    30% due by November 15th, 2015

*Fourth Instalment:                  30% due by February 15th, 2016

  • After a two week default payment period, the student may not be admitted to class.
  • Failure to make the First and Second Installments by the due dates will result in students not being assigned to classes. Students will be required to attend a separate registration process after the first day of school and will not be admitted to class on the opening day of school.
  • School fees may be paid either in cash at the school, by cheque made out to the Canadian International School of Egypt, or by a deposit at the bank. For more information on fees and payment options, please contact the Finance Manager at the school.

If a parent decides to withdraw their child from the school, the withdrawal will be considered to have occurred, for purposes of a fees refund if applicable, at the end of a term for an elementary pupil and at the end of a semester for a secondary pupil

Activity Fee

An Activity Fee of 4,000 L.E. is charged each year and should be paid at the time of the regular payment of fees. This activity few covers the cost of the school yearbook, class and individual photographs, the Student Agenda, transportation fees and entry fees for within Cairo field trips and inter-school competitions. This activity fee reduces the need to make frequent requests of parents for monies for activities.

Detailed information on fees is available from the Finance Office or the Main Office.

PROGRAM, POLICIES AND DIPLOMA REQUIREMENTS

Ontario Secondary Schools, Grades 9 to 12: Program and Diploma Requirements (1999) (OSS) sets out the policies and requirements that govern the program in English-language secondary schools offering the Ontario curriculum. The secondary school program is designed so students can meet the diploma requirements in four years following Grade 8. Courses are offered in ways intended to ensure that education is relevant both to students’ needs and interests and to the requirements of postsecondary institutions and employers.

DIPLOMA REQUIREMENTS

In order to earn an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD), a student starting Grade 9 must:

  • earn a minimum of 30 credits, including 18 compulsory and 12 optional credits;
  • complete a minimum of 40 hours of community involvement activities;
  • Successfully complete the provincial secondary school literacy test (OSSLT) or, if unsuccessful, complete the Ontario Secondary School’s literacy course (OSSLC).

For the full document, see the Ministry of Education website at www.edu.gov.on.ca

Students enrolled at CISE are timetabled accordingly

Grade 9   8 credits (8 compulsory)

Grade 10   8 credits (6 compulsory)

Grade 11  8 credits (2 or 3 compulsory)

Grade 12  7/8 credits (1 or 2 compulsory)

31/32 credits (gives extra credits in case of academic concerns and to provide variety of programming)

CREDIT REQUIREMENTS

Students must earn the following 18 compulsory credits:

4  credits in English (1 credit per grade)

1  credit in French as a second language

3 credits in Mathematics (at least 1 credit in Grade 11 or 12)

2 credits in Science

1 credit in Canadian history

1 credit in Canadian geography

1 credit in the Arts

1 credit in Health and Physical Education

0.5  credit in Civics

0.5 credit in Career Studies

 ______

 15.0

Plus three (3) additional compulsory credits:

  • One additional credit in English, or French as second language, or a Native language, or a classical or an international language, or social sciences and the humanities, or Canadian and world studies, or guidance and career education, or cooperative education.
  • One additional credit in health and physical education, or the arts, or business studies, or French as a second language, or cooperative education.
  • One additional credit in science (Grade 11 or 12), or technological education, or French as a second language or computer studies or cooperative education.

_____

18.0 total compulsory credits

Optional Credits

Students must also earn 12 optional credits by successfully completing courses they have selected for the school course calendar.

CREDIT SYSTEM

A credit is granted in recognition of the successful acquisition of a course’s curriculum expectations as identified by the subject specific curriculum document and has been scheduled for a minimum of 110 hours. Credits are granted by the principal on behalf of the Ministry of Education of Ontario for courses that have been developed or approved by the ministry. A half credit may be granted for each 55-hour part of a 110-hour ministry-developed course. “Scheduled time” is defined as the time during which students participate in planned learning activities designed to lead to the achievement of the curriculum expectations of the course. “Planned learning activities” include interaction between the teacher and student; individual and/or collaborative discussions and tasks; and self-assessment; but excludes homework completion.

COURSES

Courses are available in many subject areas in secondary schools. Within a subject area, students can further specialize their study, depending on their interests and post-secondary destination requirements. See the Course Selection section of this document for full details and descriptions of the various courses offered at CISE.

COURSE OUTLINES

The outline for each course of study in the secondary school is available in the Principal’s office and will be provided, upon request. Each teacher also has a copy of the course outline for each of his/her subjects taught. The teachers are to present these course outlines to students as they begin their course each semester.

SEMESTERED SCHOOL YEAR

The school operates on the semester system. First semester courses are taught from September to February and the second semester runs from February to June. Students normally take four courses in each semester. At the end of the semester, a final examination and/or culminating activity is usually scheduled for each class. The exception to the semester arrangement applies to some Arabic and English courses. These courses are scheduled on a Day One/Day Two basis to run through the entire school year. Final examinations and/or culminating activities for these courses are administered in June.

“REACH AHEAD” CREDITS

Under certain conditions, elementary students may “reach ahead” to take secondary school courses. In such an instance, the secondary school principal consults with the elementary principal, with the parents and with the student. Parental consent must be given. The principals ensure that the learning expectations for the elementary courses are also completed. The secondary school principal then assumes the responsibility for evaluating the student’s achievement and for granting and recording credits.

WAIVER OF PREREQUISITES

All courses are identified in ministry curriculum policy documents and no courses apart from these may be identified as prerequisites (OSS 5.3.2). A parent or an adult may request that a prerequisite be waived. The principal may also initiate consideration of whether or not the prerequisite should be waived. The principal makes a decision in consultation with the parent, the student and the appropriate school staff.

CREDIT EQUIVALENCY

For students with credentials from other jurisdictions, the principal determines the total credit equivalency as well as the number of compulsory and optional credits still to be awarded in accordance with OSS Appendix 8, Equivalent Diploma Requirements. Students working towards the OSS diploma requirements must complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test and the 40 hours of community involvement. A copy of the equivalency assessment is placed in the student’s Ontario Student Record (OSR) folder.

PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT AND RECOGNITION (PLAR)

Prior learning includes the knowledge and skills students have acquired, in both formal and informal ways, outside secondary school evaluated against the expectations outlined in provincial curriculum policy documents for the purpose of granting a credit. With regard to the “challenge” process the PLAR policy states that:

  • Students may challenge and earn a maximum of four credits for prior learning, including a maximum of two credits in any one discipline.
  • The PLAR challenge process includes a formal evaluation (70%) and other assessment strategies (30%).
  • Students can only challenge for courses that are taught in the school.

ONTARIO STUDENT RECORD (OSR)

CISE uses the Ontario Student Record (OSR) to record a student’s ongoing educational progress. The OSR is confidential and is privileged for the information and use of the principal and teachers of the school for the improvement of instruction for the student. Parents have access to all the information contained in their child’s record; a staff representative must be present during that time to answer any questions he/she might have about the documents in the OSR folder.

The OSR folder contains information such as biographical data, schools attended, names of parents(s), special health information, photographs, additional information as deemed appropriate, report cards, the Ontario Student Transcript (for High School Students), and a documentation file which may contain documents such as a custody order; educational, psychological, and health assessments; doctor’s notes; suspension letters; interview documentation; and other information as deemed appropriate.

ONTARIO STUDENT TRANSCRIPT (OST)

The Ontario Student Transcript (OST) provides an official and consistent record of the Ontario secondary school credit courses successfully completed by a student. Schools are required to provide a complete record of students’ performance. The OST must include:

  • all Grade 9 and 10 courses successfully completed by the student, with percentage grades obtained and credits earned;
  • all Grade 11 and 12 courses completed or attempted by the student, with percentage grades obtained and credits earned;
  • identification of compulsory credits, including credits that are substitutions for compulsory credits identified by the ministry as diploma requirements;
  • confirmation that the student has completed the forty hours of community involvement;
  • confirmation that the student has successfully completed the provincial secondary school literacy test or the literacy course.

The OST is a component of the Ontario Student Records (OSR) and the legislation that applies to the OSR applies also to the OST. This legislation is set out in section 266 of the Education Act and in the Ontario Student Record (OSR): Guideline, 1999.

 

ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION OF STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

The main purpose of assessment and evaluation is to improve student learning. Information gathered helps teachers identify students’ strengths and those areas needing improvement, as well as program areas of strength and those needing improvement.

Assessment is the process of gathering information from a variety of sources, including assignments, demonstrations, projects, performances, and tests. This information should demonstrate how well students are achieving the curriculum expectations. As part of assessment, teachers, peers, and individual students provide descriptive feedback that guides efforts for improvement. Assessment is ongoing and supportive.

Evaluation is the process of judging the quality of a student’s work on the basis of established achievement criteria and assigning a value to represent that quality. It reflects a student’s level of achievement of the provincial curriculum expectations at a given time.

In order to ensure that assessment and evaluation are valid and reliable and that they lead to the improvement of student learning, teachers will use a variety of assessment and evaluation strategies that:

  • address both what the students learn and how well they learn;
  • are based both on the categories of knowledge and skills and on the achievement level descriptions given in the achievement chart that appears in the curriculum policy documents for each discipline;
  • are varied in nature, administered over a period of time, and designed to provide opportunities for students to demonstrate the full range of their learning;
  • are appropriate for the learning activities used, the purposes of instruction, and the needs and experiences of the students;
  • are fair to all students;
  • accommodate the needs of students who are learning the language of instruction and need support for English as a Second Language (ESL) or English Literacy Development (ELD);
  • ensure that each student is given clear directions for improvement;
  • promote students’ abilities to assess their own and each others’ learning, and to set specific goals;
  • include the use of samples of students’ work that provide evidence of their achievement;
  • are communicated clearly to students and parents at the beginning of the course and at other appropriate points throughout the course.

Achievement Charts

Achievement charts appear in the curriculum documents of the secondary school subjects. These charts have been developed in order to provide greater consistency across the secondary panel and across subject areas. The achievement charts identify four categories of knowledge and skills. The achievement chart is a standard province-wide guide to be used by teachers. It enables teachers to make judgments about student work based on clear performance standards and on a body of evidence collected over time.

The achievement chart for each subject area and discipline is designed to:

  • provide a common framework that encompasses all curriculum expectations for all grades and all subjects/disciplines;
  • guide the development ofassessment tasks and tools;
  • help teachers to plan instruction for learning;
  • assist teachers in providing meaningful feedback to students;
  • provide a variety of aspects on which to assess and evaluate student earning.

Categories of Knowledge and Skills

Four broad areas of knowledge and skills within which achievement of the curriculum expectations for any given grade is assessed and evaluated are interrelated, and reflect the wholeness and interconnectedness of learning.

The categories of knowledge and skills are:

  • Knowledge and Understanding – subject-specific content acquired in each grade (knowledge) and the comprehension of its meaning and significance (understanding).
  • Thinking – the use of critical and creative thinking skills and/or processes (planning, processing).
  • Communication – the conveying of meaning through various forms (oral, written, visual).
  • Application – the use of knowledge and skills to make connections within and between various contexts.

Teachers are to ensure that students’ work is assessed and/or evaluated in a balanced manner with respect to these four categories, and that achievement of particular expectations is considered within the appropriate categories.

Criteria

Within each category in the achievement chart, criteria are provided, which are subsets of the knowledge and skills that define each category.

Descriptors

A “descriptor” indicates the characteristic of the student’s performance, with respect to a particular criterion, on which assessment or evaluation is focused.

Qualifiers

A specific “qualifier” is used to define each of the four levels of achievement – this is limited for Level 1, some for Level 2, considerable for Level 3, and a high degree or thorough for Level 4.

ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION

The CISE Assessment and Evaluation Policy is reflective of the Ontario Ministry of Education’s seven fundamental principles which provide the foundation for rich and challenging practice. Teachers have a leading role to play in the implementation of the seven fundamental principles and will implement practices and procedures that:

  • are fair, transparent and equitable for all students;
  • support all students, including those who are learning the language of instruction (English or French);
  • are carefully planned to relate to the curriculum expectations and learning goals and, as much as possible, to the interests, learning styles and preferences, needs, and experiences of all students;
  • are communicated clearly to students and parents at the beginning of the semester and at other appropriate points throughout the school year or course;
  • are ongoing, varied in nature, and administered over a period of time to provide multiple opportunities for students to demonstrate the full range of their learning;
  • provide ongoing descriptive feedback that is clear, specific, meaningful, and timely to support improved learning and achievement;
  • develop students’ self-assessment skills to enable them to assess their own learning, set specific goals, and plan next steps for their learning.(Growing Success, p. 6)

Professional judgement is defined as being ‘informed by professional knowledge of curriculum expectations, context, evidence of learning, methods of instruction and assessment, and the criteria and standards that indicate success in student learning’ (Growing Success, p. 152).

Assessment and Evaluation Strategies

Assessment is the process of gathering information that accurately reflects how well a student is achieving the curriculum expectations of a particular course.

Assessment has three roles:

  • providing students with feedback about their work (known as assessment for learning)
  • helping students to set learning goals and monitor their own progress (known as assessment as learning)
  • evaluating and reporting of progress in the form of grades or marks (known as assessment of learning).

Both ‘assessment for and as learning’ provide students with timely feedback on their work, and are far more valuable to the learning process than a final mark on a report card (an example of assessment of learning). The purpose of assessment and evaluation is to improve student learning. This process gives the on-going descriptive feedback that teachers provide to students so that they clearly understand what they need to do to improve their work. While the final mark/grade is important, it is generally provided at the end of the learning cycle or unit. Multiple opportunities will be provided for students to set individual learning goals and be given on-going descriptive feedback to improve their learning and demonstrate their understanding and acquisition of the subject’s curriculum expectations.

Teachers’ professional judgements are at the heart of effective assessment, evaluation, and reporting of student achievement (Growing Success, p. 43)

The following Guiding Principles are intended to support professional judgement.

  • Communication among all stakeholders (teachers, students, parents, principal) is key to the success of the assessment and evaluation process;
  • Descriptive, frequent and timely feedback are critical for the improvement of student learning;
  • Teachers will communicate timelines for both the submission of, and the return of marked assignments to students, and where appropriate to parents, in a timely manner;
  • Teachers will communicate evaluation and/or success criteria to the student at the point of distribution of the assignment;
  • Grades are used to report evidence of achievement of course expectations in a timely fashion, not to reward or punish;
  • Teachers will use a variety of strategies to allow students to demonstrate evidence of their learning;
  • Meaningful class time to work on graded assignments will be provided;
  • Teachers will use a variety of strategies to ensure students submit their assignments for evaluation and meet timelines;
  • Assignments should be designed to allow students to demonstrate the full extent of their achievement of the curriculum expectations (content standards) across all four categories of knowledge and skills as identified in the achievement charts;
  • Teachers are to make consistent judgements about the quality of student learning based on clear performance standards and on a body of evidence collected over time;
  • Consequences for late or missed assignments will be reflected in the student’s learning skills and, when appropriate, after other steps have been taken, in the deduction of marks, up to and including the full value of the assignment;
  • Mark deduction will not result in a percentage mark that, in the professional judgement of the teacher, misrepresents the student’s actual achievement;

Determining a Report Card Grade Below 50%

The lowest mark to be reported on the provincial report card below 50% can be as low as 0%. Where a mark is below 50%, the teacher will ensure that the reported grade reflects the student’s most consistent level of achievement of course expectations, with emphasis on more recent achievement of expectations. Where the situation warrants, the teacher will review the individual student’s calculated grade using his or her professional judgement. The teacher will also ensure that there has been ongoing communication with the student and parents, and key school staff (which may include the Student Success Teacher, Guidance, and/or Principal).

Use of Code “I” – Grades 9-10 (Growing Success, p. 42)

Code “I” is to be given after consultation with the school administration. Code “I” may be used on rare occasions in a student’s report card, including the final report card, to indicate that insufficient evidence is available to determine a letter grade or percentage mark. For the report card, teachers will use their professional judgement to determine when the use of “I” is appropriate and in the best interests of the students. For example: the student has enrolled in the school very recently (less than six weeks); there were issues or extenuating circumstances beyond the student’s control, such as protracted illness, that affected his or her attendance and/or ability to provide sufficient evidence of achievement of the overall expectation; or prolonged and/or regular unexcused absence from school. Code “I” may not be used in Grade 11 and 12; in these grades a percentage mark will be given and appear on the student’s report card and transcript.

Where the mark to be recorded is below 50% (Mid-Term and Final Report Card) the following roles and responsibilities are outlined below.

Teachers will:

  • communicate with parents in a timely manner when the mark on the report card is less than 50%;
  • use professional judgement to ensure that the reported grade reflects the student’s most consistent level of achievement of course expectations, with emphasis on more recent achievement of curriculum expectations;
  • communicate early and frequently with students and parents and key school staff (which may include the Student Success Teacher, Guidance, and/or Principal);
  • develop next steps and a plan for improvement in collaboration with the student;
  • make recommendations for students who may benefit from Summer School, change of academic level and/or repeating the course;
  • assist in the implementation of intervention strategies.

Students will:

  • communicate with their teacher to develop next steps and a plan for improvement;
  • commit to follow through on intervention strategies and/or a plan for improvement such as seeking extra help, completing missed/alternative assignments;
  • act on the recommendations provided by the school regarding recommendations, next steps, eSchool, change of academic level or course repetition.

Parents will:

  • be encouraged to communicate with the teacher and student to determine reasons for the unsuccessful grade and collaboratively develop next steps and a plan for improvement;
  • be encouraged to support their child to follow through with plan and/or strategies for improvement.

Student Success Team will:

  • communicate with, and support students and teachers, throughout the development and implementation of a plan for improvement;
  • review whether students require out-of-school Special Education services, additional classroom teacher support and/or support from the Student Success Team.

The Principal will:

  • review all marks where a mark is below 50%, and where appropriate, review the mark breakdown;
  • be prepared to communicate with students, parents and school staff;
  • collaborate with the teacher to respond to concerns to resolve outstanding issues;
  • support improvement plans.

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY

At CISE, we strive to help students develop integrity, a strong work ethic, responsibility and the knowledge and skills needed for success beyond school. Academic dishonesty hinders students from developing these attributes and cannot be condoned in our school.

We aim to work collectively with stakeholders to “develop strategies for helping students understand the gravity of such behaviour and the importance of acknowledging the work of others” (Growing Success, p. 42).

Cheating is defined as “any effort to defraud, deceive, or elude someone else”. Examples may include, but are not limited to: taking a test or an examination in a dishonest way through improper access to answers and giving or obtaining assistance without acknowledgement (www.dictionary.com).

Plagiarism is an act of theft known by many names: cheating, borrowing, stealing or copying. Plagiarism is when a student intentionally or unintentionally uses another person’s work or ideas and presents these as his/her own. It is a serious offence that may result in serious academic consequences.

Plagiarism usually takes one of four forms:

  • Using a quotation or sentence without citing the source;
  • Paraphrasing another’s ideas, style or language or restating those ideas in your own words, style and language without acknowledging the original source;
  • Submitting any work by another student and claiming it as your own;
  • Using without acknowledging the original source: diagrams, charts, internet graphics, questionnaires, etc.

Prevention and Detection

Education of students and parents is the most effective manner in which to prevent plagiarism and cheating. “Students must understand that the tests/exams they complete and the assignments they submit for evaluation must be their own work and that cheating and plagiarism will not be condoned” (Growing Success, p. 42).

Teachers will:

  • clearly communicate expectations and consequences related to cheating and plagiarism to students and parents;
  • communicate information to parents about the infraction and the consequences for all cases of plagiarism and cheating;
  • ensure students understand the definition of plagiarism and cheating and the consequences to their learning;
  • explicitly teach strategies for citing sources properly and for avoiding plagiarism;
  • design and structure assignments aligned with the curriculum expectations that guide students through the research and completion process;
  • whenever possible, have students complete assignments for evaluation and tests/exams under the supervision of the teacher;
  • provide meaningful class time for the completion of assignments;
  • consider the use of anti-plagiarism software, if appropriate (e.g., www.turnitin.com).

Students will:

  • be aware of assignment and test expectations;
  • organize time effectively;
  • seek assistance when necessary;
  • recognize the inappropriateness of academic dishonesty and accept the related consequences;
  • review work before submission, to ensure that plagiarism has not occurred; provide proof of, when requested, of his/her work and research (e.g., process work);
  • review work before submission to the teacher to ensure that plagiarism has not occurred;
  • accept the consequences when cheating and/or plagiarism are detected.

Parents will:

  • be informed as to how plagiarism and cheating are defined and addressed and the potential consequences;
  • be encouraged to help children set reasonable goals in keeping with the requirements of each course;
  • be encouraged to monitor homework and assignment completion.

The Principal will:

  • clearly communicate expectations and consequences to students, parents and teachers relating to cheating and plagiarism;
  • provide professional development about plagiarism and cheating to staff, and encourage the use of a range of prevention and detection strategies in classes;
  • work collaboratively with the teacher to address and resolve any concerns that arise;
  • assume final responsibility for making decisions in cases of unresolved issues regarding cheating and plagiarism;
  • record of incidents of Academic Dishonesty in the office.

Consequences

Teachers will consider the factors such as grade level, maturity, task and incident frequency as part of their professional judgement. In consultation with the principal, teachers will determine the appropriate consequences. The final decision resides with the principal.

For all cases of plagiarism and cheating, teachers will communicate information to the parents about the infraction and the consequences. Specifically, teachers will discuss the individual situation with the student; the principal will be informed; with repeated incidents, the teacher and principal will discuss the individual situation with the student and parents. Consequences will be based on the factors outlined above and may include:

  • redoing part/all of the assignment;
  • completing an alternate assignment;
  • loss of marks;
  • a mark of zero;
  • Suspension.

LATE AND MISSED ASSIGNMENTS

It is expected that students are engaged in the learning process both inside and outside the classroom. This includes the timely completion of homework and assignments. Teachers will ensure that multiple strategies of assessment are used and multiple opportunities are given for students to demonstrate their understanding of the curriculum expectations. Students are expected to communicate with teachers prior to due dates if they are unable to complete the assignment and/or task by the requested date. When, in the professional judgement of the teacher, a student is at risk of not successfully meeting the deadlines of the major assignment, the teacher will utilize and record various interventions, such as:

  • asking the student to clarify the reason for not completing the assignment;
  • helping students develop better time-management skills;
  • collaborating with other staff to prepare a part- or full-year calendar of major assignment dates for every class;
  • planning for major assignments to be completed in stages, so that students are less likely to be faced with an all-or-nothing situation at the last minute;
  • maintaining ongoing communication with students and/or parents about due dates and late assignments, and scheduling conferences with parents if the problem persists;
  • referring the student to the Student Success teacher;
  • taking into consideration legitimate reasons for missed deadlines;
  • setting up a student contract;
  • using counselling or peer tutoring to try to deal positively with problems;
  • holding teacher-student conferences;
  • reviewing the need for extra support for English language learners;
  • requiring the student to work with a school team to complete the assignment;
  • providing alternative assignments or tests/exams where, in the teacher’s professional judgement, it is reasonable and appropriate to do so;
  • Deducting marks for late assignments, up to and including the full value of the assignment. (Growing Success, p. 43)

Following attempts to support the student, a zero may be assigned when there is no evidence of learning.

Deduction of Marks

The deduction of marks and the assignment of zero on a major assignment will occur rarely and only after other interventions have been used. For major assignments (assignments that address multiple learning expectations over an extended period of instructional time) in a specific course, teachers may, after considering mitigating factors, and implementing appropriate strategies from the list above, impose mark deductions.

The process for the deduction of marks will be as follows:

  • 10% of the final mark earned by the student on the major assignment for the first school day that the assignment was deemed as late;
  • a further 5% per school day on the final mark earned by the student, to a maximum of 4 subsequent school days following the due date of the major assignment. The total number of days for which deduction of marks will apply is 5 days.

After providing multiple opportunities for the completion of the major assignment, a deduction of a maximum of 30% of the final mark earned by the student may be imposed when a major assignment is late if the assignment is completed. For example, if a student earns 80% on the major assignment, and if it is one day late, the mark on that assignment is 72%. If two days late, the mark becomes 68% (15% of 80% is a 12 mark reduction). If three days late, the mark becomes 64% (20% of 80% is a 16 mark reduction). If four days late, the mark becomes 60% (25% of 80% is a 20 mark reduction). If five days late, the mark becomes 56% (30% of 80% is a 24 mark reduction).

After providing multiple opportunities for the completion of the major assignment, the teacher may assign a mark of zero on the assignment after it is five days late. Prior to each semester, teachers shall determine which culminating tasks and/or major assignments are going to be given, and which ones will be considered under this policy. Teachers will communicate to students the expectations and timelines of each major assignment in each course at the beginning of the semester.

Teachers will:

  • maintain ongoing communication with students, parents, teacher colleagues and their principal;
  • use the appropriate strategies, based on their professional judgement, to help students provide the required evidence of their achievement;
  • use a number of strategies as outlined above;
  • in the absence of summative evaluative data, formative assessments may be used to determine grades, where appropriate;
  • in collaboration with students, will establish deadlines for submission of assignments for evaluation and clearly communicate those deadlines to students, and, where appropriate, to parents;
  • at the determined date of submission, and for purposes of timely feedback on student performance, communicate an expected time of return for assessed work;
  • work with the Student Success Teacher to address any accommodations that may be applicable;
  • provide Assessment for Learning opportunities (diagnostic and formative) before the Assessment of Learning (summative), in order to demonstrate progress of achievement of the curriculum expectations;

Students will:

  • be encouraged to discuss assignments with their teachers and parents;
  • be responsible for providing evidence of their achievement of the overall expectations within the timeframe specified by the teacher, and in a form approved by the teacher;
  • understand that there will be consequences for not completing assignments for evaluation and/or for submitting those assignments late;
  • use class time productively;
  • in extenuating circumstances, request an extension from the teacher before the due date.

Parents will:

  • be encouraged to maintain ongoing communication with their child’s, teacher, and the principal, if required;
  • be encouraged to support students to submit their completed assignments on time.

The Principal will:

  • ensure that assessment and evaluation policies and practices are communicated and followed by all teachers, students, and parents;
  • provide support for staff, including professional development, to ensure a consistent common process throughout the school;
  • assume final responsibility for making decisions in cases of unresolved issues regarding late and/or incomplete assignments;
  • support the process for teachers to provide various strategies for students to demonstrate their understanding.

FINAL EVALUATION AND EXAMINATION POLICIES

Students will be evaluated in an ongoing manner throughout the semester in each subject area (Assessment for, as and of Learning). These evaluations may take many forms: tests, quizzes, presentations, assignments, portfolio development, essays, reports, performance tasks, etc. This work, done throughout the semester, will amount to 70% of the students’ final mark in a course.

At the end of the semester students are required to write a final examination. In lieu of a final examination, the student may be asked to complete a major assignment which is referred to as a culminating activity. This final major assignment, which could take up to 6 to 8 weeks of preparation, will account for 30% of the final mark. Similarly, the final examination will account for 30% of the total, final mark in the course – a student may be asked to complete an examination plus a culminating activity still adding up to 30% of the final course mark.

Term Work: (throughout the semester) 70%

May include, but are not limited to:

Quizzes

Presentations

Assignments

Tests

Performance Tasks

Final Evaluation: (end of the semester) 30%

Final Examination

Culminating Activity

TOTAL 100%

WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE

A withdrawal from Grade 9 or 10 courses is not recorded on the Ontario Student Transcript (OST). In Grade 9 and 10 only the successfully completed courses are recorded on the students’ OST.

If students in Grade 11 or 12 courses withdraw within five instructional days following the issue of the first provincial report card in a semestered or non-semestered school, the withdrawal is not recorded on the Ontario Student Transcript (OST). If a student withdraws after five instructional days following the issue of the first provincial report card, the withdrawal is recorded on the OST (that is the course code and title). The percentage grade at the time of the withdrawal is also recorded on the OST.

In Grade 11 or 12, all attempts – withdrawals and repeats of courses – are recorded on the Ontario Student Transcript (OST). This procedure is known as “full disclosure”.

PROVINCIAL REPORT CARD

The standard Provincial Report Card includes the following information:

  • each subject that the student is studying;
  • the student’s mark expressed as a percentage grade, along with the course median;
  • number of classes missed and times late for class;
  • the student’s achievement in six learning skills;
  • a comment by each subject teacher for each subject, including student strengths, areas for improvement, and suggested next steps, as appropriate.

The report card will also indicate whether a course has been adapted to meet the needs of students who are learning English as a Second Language or need assistance with English Literacy Development.

Information on Reporting Student Achievement to Parents:

Report cards are issued four times a year – one Midterm and one Final Report for each semester. Parent conferences are held each semester. Parents are welcome to meet with a teacher or teachers when the need arises. At Risk reports are distributed at approximately 4-6 weeks into each semester to indicate student struggles in a particular course. Included with the Final Report is a summary of credits earned to date, including a break-down of compulsory and optional elective credits. Informal communication between teacher and parents on a regular basis is strongly encouraged. Teachers communicate information regarding general and upcoming instructional and assessment opportunities through emails and/or websites. In addition, teachers will communicate with parents regarding specific needs, concerns, interventions, accolades, improvements, etc. with individual parents on an as needed basis.

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES

  • Students are encouraged to develop a sense of civic responsibility and strong community values during their secondary school years.To this end, all students are required to complete a minimum of 40 hours of mandatory Community Involvement prior to graduation.
  • An indication of completion will be entered on the student’s Ontario Student Transcript when the 40 hours have been submitted and approved.
  • Secondary school staff, will discuss appropriate types of community involvement activities and projects with students and may offer suggestions, but the selection and management of the involvement is to be directed by the student.
  • CISE has published a list of “approved” and “not approved” activities on the school website; students choosing an activity not on the approved list must apply for permission, in writing, to the school Principal.
  • Activities may take place inside or outside of the school.If inside, activities may not be part of a credit programme or take place during class time.
  • The student may not displace a worker who would normally have been paid to perform the same function or receive pay.

ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL LITERACY TEST

All students who enter a secondary school delivering the Ontario curriculum and granting an Ontario Secondary School Diploma must successfully complete the provincial secondary school literacy test in order to earn a secondary school diploma. The literacy test will be based on the Ontario curriculum expectations for language and communication – particularly reading and writing – up to and including Grade 9.

The test will serve both to determine whether students have acquired the reading and writing skills considered essential for literacy, and to provide confirmation that those students who have completed the test successfully have attained the provincial expectations for literacy. The test will identify those students who have not demonstrated the required skills and will identify areas in which these students need remediation.

CISE will provide remedial assistance to those students who do not complete the test successfully. This assistance will be designed to help students improve their skills so that they are better prepared to retake their literacy test. Once students have successfully completed the literacy test, they may not retake the test in the same language (i.e., English or French). Students’ transcripts will contain a record of whether or not they have completed the literacy requirement. The Ontario Secondary School literacy course will be provided at CISE for students who were unsuccessful on the test. This course (OLC4O) will be provided in Grade 12.

Accommodations, Deferrals, and Exemptions:

  • Accommodations – The necessary accommodations must be made to ensure that students who are receiving special education programs and services and who have an Individual Education Plan (IEP) have fair and equal opportunity to successfully complete the secondary school literacy test.Students needing such accommodations may or may not have been formally identified as exceptional by an Identification, Placement, and Review Committee (IPRC). The accommodations made will be the same as those that are set out in the student’s IEP and/or that are available to the student in the course of his or her regular school work, including examinations and other forms of evaluation. While accommodations such as alternative forms of print and extra time are acceptable, the actual content of the secondary school literacy test must not be altered.
  • Deferrals – Students who might benefit from a deferral of the test may include students who have been identified as exceptional and students registered in English as a second language/English literacy development (ESL/ELD) courses, who have not yet acquired the level of proficiency in English required for successfully completing the test.If a parent or an adult student requests a deferral, the principal will determine whether or not a deferral should be granted and, if so, for what period of time. A principal may also initiate consideration of a deferral. The principal will make his or her decision in consultation with the parent or adult student and appropriate school staff. In cases where the parent or adult student disagrees with the decision of the principal, the parent or adult student may ask the appropriate supervisory officer to review the matter.
  • Exemptions – Students whose IEP indicates that the student is not working towards the attainment of a secondary school diploma may, with parental consent and the approval of the principal, be exempted from participating in the secondary school literacy test.Students who do not successfully complete the literacy test will not be able to receive a secondary school diploma. Should the learning expectations contained in the student’s IEP be revised at some point so as to allow the student to work towards the attainment of the secondary school diploma, the student would be expected to successfully complete the secondary school literacy test.

SUPPORT SERVICES AND RESOURCES

Students have access to our school library and computer lab in order to research assignments as well as to work in a quiet setting. A Librarian, a Guidance Counsellor and a Student Success Teacher are available to assist our students with planning and organizing. The Student Success Teacher is also available in the Student Success Room to help students with missed assignments/tests due to absences.

ONTARIO CURRICULUM POLICY DOCUMENTS

Documents related to the Ontario Curriculum in all subject/content areas are available in the Principal’s office. Other documents such as: “Course Descriptions and Prerequisites”; “Guide to the Provincial Report Card, Grades 9-12”; “Ontario Secondary Schools, Grade 9 to 12 – Programme and Diploma Requirements 1999 (OSS)”; and “Programme Planning and Assessment” are also available, upon request, in the Principal’s office. Course outlines are also available for all secondary school courses taught at the Canadian International School of Egypt.

SUBSTITUTIONS FOR COMPULSORY COURSES

In order to allow flexibility in designing a student’s programme and to ensure that all students can qualify for the secondary school diploma, substitutions may be made for up to three courses – using courses from the remaining courses offered by the school that meet the requirements for compulsory credits. To meet individual students’ needs, the Principal may replace up to three of these courses (or the equivalent in half courses) with courses from the remainder of those that meet the compulsory credit requirements. In all cases, however, the sum of compulsory and optional credits will not be less than thirty for students aiming to earn the Ontario Secondary School Diploma and not less than fourteen for those aiming to earn the Ontario Secondary School Certificate. Substitutions should be made to promote and enhance student learning or to meet special needs and interests.

ALTERNATIVE FORM OF RECOGNITION OF ACHIEVEMENT

If a student leaves school before earning the Ontario Secondary School Diploma, but has earned a minimum of 14 credits (7 compulsory credits and 7 optional credits), he or she may be granted an Ontario Secondary School Certificate on request. The credits must be earned as follows:

  • 2English
  • 1Canadian geography or history
  • 1mathematics
  • 1science
  • 1health and physical education
  • 1arts or technological education
  • 7optional credits

A student who leaves school without fulfilling the requirements for either the Ontario Secondary School Certificate may be given a Certificate of Accomplishment. This Certificate is a useful means of recognizing a students’ participation in the secondary school programme.

REMEDIATION PROGRAMMES

If a student has completed a course but has failed to achieve the curriculum expectations at a passing level, staff will determine the best way to enable the student to earn a credit for the course, in consultation with the student and parents. If possible, the student should be allowed to repeat only the material relating to the expectations not achieved. This may be done through independent study, through an individualized remediation programme designed for a group of students if one is offered at the school. The student may be required to, or choose to, repeat the course.

GUIDELINES FOR ONLINE COURSES

Every student and his/her educational needs are unique. The school is committed to working in each student’s best interests. In most cases, those needs are best served in a classroom setting receiving direct instruction from a teacher and interacting with peers. Therefore, online courses will only be accepted in exceptional circumstances (e.g., a student has a particular interest and we do not offer the course) and must be preapproved by the Principal. Online courses will not be accepted in the following cases:

  • When a student has not received prior permission
  • When a student has failed a compulsory course
  • When the school offers that particular course during that semester
  • When a student is trying to fast-track to graduate early.

In the event that a student does choose to pursue an online course, that course is entirely the students’ responsibility – both in registration and completion. The school is not obligated to find course, register students, or monitor student progress. The school will proctor a final evaluation when arrangements are made with suitable notice.

GUIDANCE AND CAREER EDUCATION

Throughout this publication efforts have been made to link the program components of this guide to specific competencies addressed in Choices Into Action, Guidance and Career Education Program Policy for Ontario Elementary and Secondary Schools, 1999, the basis for delivery of guidance and career education programs, grades 1 – 12. By the end of secondary school, students are expected to:

  • understand the concepts related to the life-long learning, interpersonal relationships, responsible citizenship and career planning;
  • developed learning skills, social skills, a sense of social responsibility, and the ability to formulate and pursue educational and career goals;
  • apply this learning in their daily lives, both at school and in the larger community.

Guidance and Career Education is a school-wide program which:

  • provides all students with the opportunity to understand, develop and apply the concepts in three areas of learning: Student Development, Interpersonal Development and Career Development;
  • provides structures and processes which identify the unique needs of all students;
  • provides supportive settings, programs and resources to prepare students for life-long learning and responsible citizenship in a global environment.

Resources:

Ontario Ministry of Education www.edu.gov.on.ca

Growing Success, Assessment, Evaluation, and Effective Date 2011 Sep. 01

Reporting In Ontario Schools, 2010

Learning For All, 2009

Thames Valley District School Board, Equity and Inclusive Education Policy #2022

COURSE SELECTION

Courses Offered at CISE

The following courses are offered for the 2013-2014 academic year. Students should refer to the Course Selection Form for specific courses and the semester and time they are offered. For a full description of the expectation of the courses please see the Ontario Ministry of Education web site: http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/

UNDERSTANDING COURSE CODES AND DESCRIPTIONS

Course Code or Descriptor Language or Grade Level Course Type Program Differentiation Course Title
MPM 2 D 1 Principles of Mathematics

Course Descriptors

A = The Arts H = Social Sciences and the Humanities

B = Business Studies I = Computer Science

L = Classical and International Languages

C = Canadian and World Studies M = Mathematics

E = English, English Literacy

Development, English as A P = Health and Physical Education

Second Language

F = French S = Science

G = Guidance and Career Education T = Technological Education

Grade or Language Level

Grades Languages 

1 = Grade 9 A=Level 1

2 = Grade 10 B=Level 2

3 = Grade 11 C=Level 3

4 = Grade 12 D=Level 4

E=Level 5

Course Type (more detailed description on following page)

O = Open

D = Academic P = Applied

U = University M = College or University

Program Differentiation for Non-Tech Courses

1 = Regular credit course

5 = French Immersion Course (may also be indicated with an X)

A = Part 1 (0.5)

B = Part 2 (0.5)

Health and Physical Education

F = course for females

M = course for males

COURSE DESCRIPTOR

MPM2D1Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10, Academic

The course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend problem solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relations and their applications; solve and apply linear systems; verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry; and investigate the trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multistep problems.

Prerequisite: Principle Mathematics, Grade 9, Academic

Careful attention should be given to these:

Prerequisite: A course which the Ministry of Education has designated as a requirement to be completed prior to undertaking a course.

Co-requisite: A course which must be studied at the same time as another course.

Recommendation Preparation: A course which is highly recommended as providing the necessary foundation for another course but which is not designated as mandatory preparation by the Ministry of Education.

COURSE TYPES

At the Canadian International School of Egypt, courses in Grades 9 and 10 are either Academic or Open.

Academic Courses (Grades 9 and 10):

‘D’ in the fifth position in the course code – focuses on the essential concepts of the discipline, and also explores related concepts. Course work develops student knowledge and skills by emphasizing theoretical and abstract applications of the essential concepts and incorporating practical applications as appropriate. The emphasis is on theory and abstract thinking as a basis for future learning and problem solving.

Applied Courses (Grades 9 and 10):

‘P’ in the fifth position in the course coded – also focus on the essential concepts of the discipline, but develop students’ knowledge and skills by emphasizing practical, concrete applications of these concepts and incorporating theoretical applications as appropriate.

Open Courses (Grades 9 to 12):

O’ in the fifth position of the course code – allow students to broaden their skills and knowledge in a subject that interests them and which may or may not be related to their post-secondary path. Open courses have one set of expectations for the subject, appropriate for all students in a given grade. These courses are designed to provide students with a broad educational base that will prepare them for productive participation in society.

In Grades 11 and 12 at the Canadian International School of Egypt, courses are either University Preparation orUniversity/College Preparation or College Preparation.

University Preparation Courses (Grades 11 and 12):

‘U’ in the fifth position of the course code – denotes courses which provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to meet entrance requirements for university study. Teaching and learning will emphasize theoretical aspects of the course content, with supporting applications. The courses will focus on the development of both independent research skills and independent learning skills.

University/ College Preparation Courses (Grades 11 and 12):

‘M’ in the fifth position of the course code – denotes courses that include content that is relevant for both university and college programmes. They provide students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for specific university and college programmes. The range of courses offered and the content of these courses will allow students to prepare for college and university programmes and related careers. Teaching and learning will emphasize both theoretical aspects and related concrete applications of the course content.

 

Course Descriptions for the Arts

Drama ADA2O

Grade 10, Open 

This course provides opportunities for students to explore dramatic forms, conventions, and techniques. Students will explore a variety of dramatic sources from various cultures and -representing a range of genres. Students will use the elements of drama in creating and -communicating through dramatic works. Students will assume responsibility for decisions made in the creative and collaborative processes and will reflect on their experiences.

Prerequisite: None

Drama ADA3M

Grade 11, University/College Preparation

This course requires students to create and perform in dramatic presentations. Students will analyse, interpret, and perform dramatic works from various cultures and time periods. -Students will research various acting styles and conventions that could be used in their presentations, and analyse the functions of playwrights, directors, actors, designers, technicians, and audiences.

Prerequisite: Drama, Grade 9 or 10, Open

Drama ADA4M

Grade 12, University/College Preparation

This course requires students to experiment individually and collaboratively with forms and conventions of both drama and theatre from various cultures and time periods. Students will interpret dramatic literature and other texts and media sources while learning about various theories of directing and acting. Students will examine the significance of dramatic arts in -various cultures, and will analyse how the knowledge and skills developed in drama are related to their personal skills, social awareness, and goals beyond secondary school.

Prerequisite: Drama, Grade 11, University/College Preparation

Visual Arts  AVI1O 

Grade 9, Open

This course offers an overview of visual arts as a foundation for further study. Students will become familiar with the elements and principles of design and the expressive qualities of various materials through working with a range of materials, processes, techniques, and styles. They will learn and use methods of analysis and criticism and will study the characteristics of particular historical art periods and a selection of Canadian art and the art of other cultures.

Prerequisite: None

Visual Arts AVI2O

Grade 10, Open

This course emphasizes learning through practice; building on what students know; and introducing them to new ideas, materials, and processes for artistic thinking and experimentation. Student learning will include the refined application of the elements and principles of design, incorporating the creative and design processes, and the relationship between form and content. Students will also learn about the connections between works of art and their historical contexts. Course objectives may be achieved either through a comprehensive program or through a program focused on a particular art form (e.g., drawing, painting).

Prerequisite: None

Visual Arts    AVI3M Grade 11, University/College Preparation

This course provides students with opportunities to further develop their skills and knowledge in visual arts. Students will explore a range of subject matter through studio activities, and will consolidate their practical skills. Students will also analyse art works and study aspects of Western art history, as well art forms from Canada and other parts of the world.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts, Grade 9 or 10, Open

Visual Arts  AVI4M

Grade 12, University/College Preparation

This course focuses on refinement of students’ skills and knowledge in visual arts. Students will analyze art forms; use theories of art in analyzing and producing art; and increase their understanding of stylistic changes in modern and contemporary Western art, Canadian (including Native Canadian) art, and art forms from various parts of the world. Students will produce a body of work demonstrating a personal approach.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts, Grade 11, University/College Preparation Open

Vocal Music  AMV1O 

Grade 9, Open

This course emphasizes the creation and performance of vocal music at a level consistent with previous experience and is aimed at developing technique, sensitivity, and imagination. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range of reflective and analytical activities. Students will develop an understanding of the conventions and elements of music and of safe practices related to music, and will develop a variety of skills transferable to other areas of their life.

Prerequisite: None

Vocal Music  AMV2O 

Grade 10, Open

This course emphasizes the creation and performance of music at a level consistent with previous experience. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range of reflective and analytical activities. Students will develop their understanding of musical conventions, practices, and terminology and apply the elements of music in a range of activities. They will also explore the function of music in society with reference to the self, communities, and cultures.

Prerequisite: None

Vocal Music  AMU3M 

Grade11, University/College

This course provides students with opportunities to develop their musical literacy through the creation, appreciation, analysis, and performance of music, including traditional, commercial, and art music. Students will apply the creative process when performing appropriate technical exercises and repertoire and will employ the critical analysis processes when reflecting on, responding to, and analysing live and recorded performances. Students will consider the function of music in society and the impact of music on individuals and communities. They will explore how to apply skills developed in music to their life and careers.

Prerequisite: Music, Grade 9 or 10, Open

Course Description for Business Studies

Introduction to Business     BBI2O

Grade 10, Open

This course introduces students to the world of business. Students will develop an understanding of the functions of business, including accounting, marketing, information and communication technology, human resources, and production, and of the importance of ethics and social responsibility. This course builds a foundation for further studies in business and helps students develop the business knowledge and skills they will need in their everyday lives.

Prerequisite: None

Information and Communication Technology in Business   BTT2O

Grade 10, Open 

This course introduces students to information and communication technology in a business environment and builds a foundation of digital literacy skills necessary for success in a technologically driven society. Students will develop word processing, spreadsheet, database, desktop publishing, presentation software, and website design skills. Throughout the course, there is an emphasis on digital literacy, effective electronic research and communication skills, and current issues related to the impact of information and communication technology.

Prerequisite: None

Marketing: Goods, Services, Events      BMI3C Grade 11, College Preparation

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of product marketing, which includes the marketing of goods, services, and events. Students will examine how trends, issues, global economic changes, and information technology influence consumer buying habits. Students will engage in marketing research, develop marketing strategies, and produce a marketing plan for product of their choice.

Prerequisite: None

Financial Accounting Fundamentals     BAF3M

Grade 11, University/College Preparation

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and procedures of accounting. Students will develop financial analysis and decision-making skills that will assist them in future studies and/or career opportunities in business. Students will acquire an understanding of accounting for a service and a merchandising business, computerized accounting, financial analysis, and ethics and current issues in accounting.

Prerequisite: None

International Business Fundamentals   BBB4M 

Grade 12, University/College Preparation

This course provides an overview of the importance of international business and trade in the global economy and explores the factors that influence success in international markets. Students will learn about the techniques and strategies associated with marketing, distribution, and managing international business effectively. This course prepares students for postsecondary programs in business, including international business, marketing, and management.

Prerequisite: None

Business Leadership: Management Fundamentals   BOH4M

Grade 12, University/College Preparation

This course focuses on the development of leadership skills used in managing a successful business. Students will analyse the role of a leader in business, with a focus on decision making, management of group dynamics, workplace stress and conflict, motivation of employees, and planning. Effective business communication skills, ethics, and social responsibility are also emphasized.

Prerequisite: None

Course Descriptions for Canadian and World Studies

Issues in Canadian Geography     CGC1D

Grade 9, Academic  

This course examines interrelationships within and between Canada’s natural and human systems and how these systems interconnect with those in other parts of the world. Students will explore environmental, economic, and social geographic issues relating to topics such as transportation options, energy choices, and urban development. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, to investigate various geographic issues and to develop possible approaches for making Canada a more sustainable place to live.

Prerequisite: None

Canadian History since World War I   CHC2D

Grade 10, Academic

This course explores social, economic, and political developments and events and their impact on the lives of different groups in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on Canadian identity, citizenship and heritage. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914.

Prerequisite: None

Civics and Citizenship    CHV2O

Grade 10, Open 

This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Students will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and of political processes in the local, national, and/or global community. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate, and express informed opinions about , a range of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to them.

Prerequisite: None

Understanding Canadian Law    CLU3M

Grade 11, University/College Preparation

This course explores Canadian law with focus on legal issues that are relevant to people’s everyday lives. Students will investigate fundamental legal concepts and processes to gain a practical understanding of Canada’s legal system, including the criminal justice system. Students will use critical-thinking, inquiry, and communication skills to develop informed opinions on legal issues and apply this knowledge in a variety of ways and settings, including case analysis, legal research projects, mock trials, and debates.

Prerequisite: Canadian History since World War I, Grade 10, Academic or Applied

Travel and Tourism: A Geographic Perspective    CGG3O 

Grade 11, Open

This course focuses on issues related to travel and tourism within and between various regions of the world. Students will investigate unique environmental, sociocultural, economic, and political characteristics of selected world regions. They will explore travel patterns and trends as well as tensions related to tourism, and will predict future tourism destinations. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, to investigate the impact of the travel industry on natural environments and human communities.

Prerequisite: Grade 9, Canadian Geographic Issues, Academic or Applied

 

The Individual and the Economy      CIE3M

Grade 11, University/College Preparation

This course explores challenges facing the Canadian economy as well as the implications of various responses to these challenges. Students will explore the economic role of business, labour, and government as well as their own role as individual consumers and contributors, and how all of these influence stability and variability in the Canadian economy. Students will apply the concepts of economic thinking and the economic inquiry process, including economic models, to investigate the impact of economic decisions.

Prerequisite: Canadian History since World War I, Grade 10, Academic or Applied

World Issues: A Geographic Analysis       CGW4U

Grade 12, University Preparation

This course looks at the global challenge of creating a more sustainable and equitable world. Students will explore a range of issues involving environmental, economic, social, and geopolitical interrelationships, and will examine governmental policies related to these issues. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, to investigate these complex issues, including their impact on natural and human communities around the world.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities

The Environment and Resource Management      CGR4M

Grade 12, University/College Preparation

This course explores interactions between the natural and human environment, with a particular focus on the impact of human activity on various ecosystems. Students will explore resource management and sustainability practices, as well as related government policy and international protocols. Applying the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, students will investigate the relationship between people and the natural environment and will propose approaches for developing more sustainable relationships, including environmentally responsible actions that support stewardship.

Prerequisite: Any university, university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities.

World History to the End of the Fifteenth Century   CHW3M

Grade 11, University/College Preparation

This course explores the history of various societies around the world, from earliest times to around 1500 CE. Students will examine life in and the legacy of various ancient and pre-modern societies throughout the world, including those in, Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. Students will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating social, political, and economic structures and historical forces at work in various societies and in different historical eras.

Prerequisite: Canadian History since World War I, Grade 10, Academic or Applied

World History since the Fifteenth Century      CHY4U

Grade 12, University Preparation

This course traces major developments and events in world history since approximately 1450. Students will explore social, economic, and political changes, the historical roots of contemporary issues, and the role of conflict and cooperation in global interrelationships. They will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, as they investigate key issues and assess societal progress or decline in world history.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities

Canadian and International Law     CLN4U 

Grade 12, University preparation

This course explores a range of contemporary legal issues and how they are addressed in both Canadian and international law. Students will develop their understanding of the principles of Canadian and international law when exploring rights and freedoms within the context of topics such as religion, security, cyberspace, immigration, crimes against humanity, and environmental protection. Students will apply the concepts of legal thinking and the legal inquiry process when investigating these issues in both Canadian and international contexts, and they will develop legal reasoning skills and an understanding of conflict resolution in the area of international law.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities

Canadian and World Politics    CPW4U

Grade 12, University Preparation

This course explores various perspectives on issues in Canadian and world politics. Students will explore political decision-making and ways in which individuals, stakeholders groups, and various institutions, including different levels of government, multinational corporations, and non-governmental organizations, respond to and work to influence domestic and international developments. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate current political policies, issues, and events, and to develop and communicate informed opinions about them.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities

Course Descriptions for English

Compulsory

English     ENG1D Grade 9, Academic  

This course is designed to develop the oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. The course is intended to prepare students for the Grade 10 academic English course, which leads to university or college preparation courses in Grades 11 and 12.

Prerequisite: None

English    ENG2D

Grade 10, Academic

This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 11 university or college preparation course.

Prerequisite: English, Grade 9, Academic or Applied

English     ENG3U

Grade 11, University Preparation

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course.

Prerequisite: English, Grade 10, Academic

English     ENG4U

Grade 12, University Preparation

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace.

Prerequisite: English, Grade 11, University Preparation

Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course   OLC4O

Grade 12, Open

This course is designed to help students acquire and demonstrate the cross-curricular literacy skills that are evaluated by the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). Students who complete the course successfully will meet the provincial literacy requirement for graduation. Students will read a variety of informational, narrative, and graphic texts and will produce a variety of forms of writing, including summaries, information paragraphs, opinion pieces, and news reports. Students will also maintain and manage a portfolio containing a record of their reading experiences and samples of their writing.

Eligibility requirement: Students who have been eligible to write OSSLT at least twice and who have been unsuccessful at least once are eligible to take the course. (Students who have already met the literacy requirement for graduation may be eligible to take the course under special circumstances, at the discretion of the principal)

Optional

Presentation and Speaking Skills    EPS3O

Grade 11, Open

This course emphasizes the knowledge and skills required to plan and make effective presentations and to speak effectively in both formal and informal contexts, using such forms as reports, speeches, debates, panel discussions, storytelling, recitations, interviews, and multimedia presentations. Students will research and analyse the content and characteristics of convincing speeches and the techniques of effective speakers; design and rehearse presentations for a variety of purposes and audiences; select and use visual and technological aids to enhance their message; and assess the effectiveness of their own and others’ presentations.

Prerequisite: English, Grade 10, Academic or Applied

Media Studies    EMS3O

Grade 11, Open

This course emphasizes knowledge and skills that will enable students to understand media communication in the twenty-first century and to use media effectively and responsibly. Through analysing the forms and messages of a variety of media works and audience responses to them, and through creating their own media works, students will develop critical thinking skills, aesthetic and ethical judgment, and skills in viewing, representing, listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Prerequisite: Grade 10 English, Academic or Applied

The Writer’s Craft   EWC4U

Grade 12, University Preparation

This course emphasizes knowledge and skills related to the craft of writing. Students will analyse models of effective writing; use a workshop approach to produce a range of works; identify and use techniques required for specialized forms of writing; and identify effective ways to improve the quality of their writing. They will also complete a major paper as part of a creative or analytical independent study project and investigate opportunities for publication and for writing careers.

Prerequisite: English, Grade 11, University Preparation

Course Descriptions for French Immersion

French Immersion     FIF1D

Grade 9, Academic

This course provides opportunities for students to speak and interact in French independently in a variety of real-life and personally relevant contexts. Students will develop their ability to communicate in French with confidence by using language-learning strategies introduced in the elementary French Immersion program. Students will enhance their knowledge of the language through the study of French-Canadian literature. They will also continue to increase their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities and to develop the skills necessary to become life-long language learners.

Prerequisite: Minimum of 3800 hours of instruction in French, or equivalent

French Immersion       FIF2D

Grade 10, Academic

This course provides students with extensive opportunities to communicate, interact, and think critically and creativity in French. Students will use a variety of language-learning strategies in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and will respond to and interact with print, oral, visual, and electronic texts. Students will develop their knowledge of the French language through the study of contemporary and historically well-known French European literature. They will also continue to increase their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities and to develop the skills necessary to become life-long language learners.

Prerequisite: French Immersion, Grade 9, Academic or Applied

Geographie du Canada       CGC1DX

Grade 9, Academic 

This French immersion course explores Canada’s distinct and changing character and the geographic systems and relationships that shape it. Students will investigate the interactions of natural and human systems within Canada, as well as Canada’s economic, cultural, and environmental connections to other countries. Students will use a variety of geotechnologies and inquiry and communication methods to analyse and evaluate geographic issues and present their findings.

Prerequisite: Minimum of 3800 hours of instruction in French, or equivalent

**Other options may be added at a later date depending upon registration and teacher qualifications. Register for the equivalent course in English. **

Course Descriptions for French as a Second Language

Core French  FSF1P

Grade 9, Applied

This course provides opportunities for students to communicate and interact in French in structured situations on everyday topics and to apply their knowledge of French in everyday situations. Students will continue to develop language knowledge and skills introduced in the elementary Core French program, through practical applications and concrete examples, and will use creative and critical thinking skills in various ways. They will also enhance their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop the skills necessary to become life-long language learners.

Prerequisite: Minimum of 600 hours of elementary Core French instruction, or equivalent 

Core French  FSF1D

Grade 9, Academic

This course provides opportunities for students to communicate and interact in French with increasing independence, with a focus on familiar topics related to their daily lives. Students will continue to develop language knowledge and skills by using language-learning strategies introduced in the elementary Core French program, and will apply creative and critical thinking skills in various ways. They will also enhance their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop the skills necessary to become life-long language learners.

Prerequisite: Minimum of 600 hours of elementary Core French instruction, or equivalent

Core French    FSF2D

Grade 10, Academic

This course provides opportunities for students to communicate in French about personally relevant, familiar, and academic topics in real-life situations with increasing independence. Students will exchange information, ideas, and opinions with others in guided and increasingly spontaneous spoken interactions. Students will continue to develop their language knowledge and skills through the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. They will also increase their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will continue to develop the skills necessary to become life-long language learners.

Prerequisite: Core French, Grade 9, Academic or Applied

Core French   FSF3U

Grade 11, University Preparation

This course offers students extended opportunities to speak and interact in real-life situations in French with greater independence. Students will develop their creative and critical thinking skills through responding to and exploring a variety of oral and written texts. They will continue to broaden their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities and to develop the skills necessary for life-long language learning.

Prerequisite: Core French, Grade 10, Academic

Core French    FSF4U  

Grade 12, University Preparation

This course provides extensive opportunities for students to speak and interact in French independently. Students will apply language-learning strategies in a wide variety of real-life situations, and will continue to develop their creative and critical thinking skills through responding to and interacting with a variety of oral and written texts. Students will also continue to enrich their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities and to develop the skills necessary for life-long language learning.

Prerequisite: Core French, Grade 11, University Preparation

Course Descriptions for Guidance and Career Education

Career Studies     GLC2O

Grade 10, Open

This course teaches students how to develop and achieve personal goals for future learning, work, and community involvement. Students will assess their interests, skills, and characteristics and investigate current economic and workplace trends, work opportunities, and ways to search for work. The course explores postsecondary learning and career options, prepares students for managing work and life transitions, and helps students focus on their goals through the development of a career plan.

Prerequisite: None

Learning Strategies 1: Skills for Success in Sec. School   GLE1O

Grade 9, Open

This course focuses on learning strategies to help students become better, more independent learners. Students will learn how to develop and apply literacy and numeracy skills, personal management skills, and interpersonal and teamwork skills to improve their learning and achievement in school, the workplace, and the community. The course helps students build confidence and motivation to pursue opportunities for success in secondary school and beyond.

Prerequisite: Recommendation of principal

Learning Strategies 1: Skills for Success in Sec.School   GLE2O

Grade 10, Open

This course focuses on learning strategies to help students become better, more independent learners. Students will learn how to develop and apply literacy and numeracy skills, personal management skills, and interpersonal and teamwork skills to improve their learning and achievement in school, the workplace, and the community. The course helps students build confidence and motivation to pursue opportunities for success in secondary school and beyond.

Prerequisite: Recommendation of principal

Course Descriptions for Social Sciences and Humanities

World Religions and Belief Traditions: Perspectives, Issues, and Challenges  HRT3M

Grade 11, University/College Preparation

This course provides students with opportunities to explore various world religions and belief traditions. Students will develop knowledge of the terms and concepts relevant to this area of study, will examine the ways in which religions and belief traditions meet various human needs, and will learn about the relationship between belief and action. They will examine sacred writing and teachings, consider how concepts of time and place influence different religions and belief traditions, and develop research and inquiry skills related to the study of human expressions of belief.

Prerequisite: None

Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology, and Sociology  HSP3U

Grade 11, University Preparation

This course provides students with opportunities to think critically about theories, questions, and issues related to anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Students will develop an understanding of the approaches and research methods used by social scientists. They will be given opportunities to explore theories from a variety of perspectives, to conduct social science, and to become familiar with current thinking on a range of issues within the three disciplines.

Prerequisite: The Grade 10 academic course in English or the Grade 10 academic history course (Canadian and world studies).

Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology, and Sociology   HSP3C

Grade 11, College Preparation

This course introduces students to theories, questions, issues related to anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Students learn about approaches and research methods used by social scientists. They will be given opportunities to apply theories from a variety of perspectives, to conduct social science research, and to become familiar with current issues within the three disciplines.

Prerequisite: None

Individuals and Families in a Diverse Society     HHS4M

Grade 12, University/College

This course applies current theories and research from the disciplines of anthropology, psychology, and sociology to the study of individual development, family behaviour, intimate and parent-child relationships, and the ways in which families interact within the diverse Canadian society. Students will learn the interpersonal skills required contributing to the well-being of families, and the investigative skills required to conduct and evaluate research about individuals and families.

Prerequisite: Any university, university/college, or college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies

Challenge and Change in Society   HSB4U

Grade 12, University Preparation

This course focuses on the use of social science theories, perspectives, and methodologies to investigate and explain shifts in knowledge, attitude, beliefs, and behavior and their impact on society. Students will critically analyse how and why cultural, social, and behavior patterns change over time. They will explore the ideas of social theorists and use those ideas to analyse causes of and responses to challenges such as technological change, deviance, and global inequalities. Students will explore ways in which social science research methods can be used to study social change.

Prerequisite: Any university, university/college, or college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies

 

Philosophy: Questions and Theories  HZT4U

Grade 12, University Preparation

This course addresses three (or more) of the main areas of philosophy: metaphysics, logic, epistemology, ethics, social and political philosophy, and aesthetics. Students will learn critical thinking skills, the main ideas expressed by philosophers from a variety of the world’s traditions, how to develop and explain their own philosophical ideas, and how to apply those ideas to contemporary social issues and personal experiences. This course will also help students refine skills used in researching and investigating topics in philosophy.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies

Philosophy: The Big Questions HZB3M

Grade 11, University/College Preparation

This course encourages exploration of philosophy’s big questions, such as: What is a meaningful life? What separates right from wrong? What constitutes knowledge? What makes something beautiful? What is a just society? Students will develop critical thinking and philosophical reasoning skills as they identify and analyse the responses of philosophers to the big questions and formulate their own response to them. Students will explore the relevance philosophical questions to society and to their everyday life. They will develop research and inquiry skills as they investigate various topics in philosophy.

Prerequisite: None

Course Descriptions for Computer Studies

Introduction to Computer Science  ICS3U

Grade 11, University Preparation 

This course introduces students to computer science. Students will design software independently and as part of a team, using industry-standard programming tools and applying the software development life-cycle model. They will also write and use subprograms within computer programs. Students will develop creative solutions for various types of problems as their understanding of the computing environment grows. They will also explore environmental and ergonomic issues, emerging research in computer science, and global career trends in computer-related fields.

Prerequisite: None.

Computer Science       ICS4U

Grade 12, University Preparation

This course enables students to further develop knowledge and skills in computer science. Students will use modular design principles to create complex and fully documented programs, according to industry standards. Student teams will manage a large software development project, from planning through to project review. Students will also analyse algorithms for effectiveness. They will investigate ethical issues in computing and further explore environmental issues, emerging technologies, areas of research in computer science, and careers in the field.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Science, Grade 11 University Preparations.

Course Descriptions for International Languages

Arabic    LYAAO

Level 1, Open

This course introduces students to language elements they will need to begin to communicate with native speakers. Students will participate in practical activities in which they can apply their knowledge and skills, and will begin to explore careers that require knowledge of Arabic. They will explore aspects of the culture of countries where Arabic is spoken, including social customs, music, and food, by participating in cultural events and activities involving both print and technological resources.

Prerequisite: None

Arabic   LYABO

Level 2, Open

This course provides students with opportunities to further develop their oral communication skills in Arabic, increase their confidence in using the language in practical situations, and continue to investigate related career opportunities. Students will be involved in activities that promote the use of the language in real-life situations. They will also continue their exploration of the culture of countries where Arabic is spoken.

Although students will continue to expand their vocabulary and repertoire of language structures, the language they will use at this level will still be simple.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites will be determined by school boards, depending on the structure of their Arabic program

Arabic   LYAAD

Level 1, Academic

This course is designed to enable students to begin to communicate with native speakers of Arabic. Students will use simple language and read age- and language-appropriate passages for various purposes. They will explore aspects of the culture of countries where Arabic is spoken, including social customs and the arts, by participating in cultural events and activities involving both print and technological resources.

Prerequisite: None

Arabic  LYABD

Level 2, Academic

This course provides students with the language learning experiences that will enable them to communicate in Arabic. Students will continue to develop and apply their speaking skills in a variety of contexts, and will participate in activities that will improve their reading comprehension and writing skills. They will also continue to explore aspects of the culture of countries where Arabic is spoken by taking part in community sponsored events and activities involving both print and technological resources. Although students will continue to expand their vocabulary and repertoire of language structures, the language they will use at this level will still be simple.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites will be determined by school boards, depending on the structure of their Arabic program.

  

Arabic  LYACU

Level 3, University Preparation

This course offers students opportunities to further develop their knowledge of Arabic and to enhance their communication skills. Students will use increasingly sophisticated language in a variety of activities that will enable them to speak and write with clarity and accuracy. Students will also enhance their thinking skills through the critical study of literature, and continue to explore aspects of the culture of countries where Arabic is spoken through a variety of print and technological resources.

Prerequisite: Arabic, Level 2, Academic

Arabic  LYADU

Level 4, University Preparation

This course prepares students for university studies in Arabic. Students will enhance their ability to use the language with clarity and precision, and will develop the language skills needed to engage in sustained conversations and discussions, understand and evaluate information, read diverse materials for both study and pleasure, and write clearly and effectively. Students will also have opportunities to add to their knowledge of the culture of countries where Arabic is spoken through the use of community resources and computer technology.

Prerequisite: Arabic, Level 3, University Preparation

Course Descriptions for Mathematics

Foundations of Mathematics      MFM1P

Grade 9, Applied

This course enables students to develop and understanding of mathematical concepts related to introductory algebra, proportional reasoning, and measurement and geometry through investigation, the effective use of technology, and hands-on activities. Students will investigate real-life examples to develop various representations of linear relations, and will determine the connections between the representations. They will also explore certain relationships that emerge from the measurement of three-dimensional figures and two-dimensional shapes. Students will consolidate their mathematical skills as they solve problems and communicate their thinking.

Prerequisite: None

Principles of Mathematics     MPM1D

Grade 9, Academic

This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to algebra, analytic geometry, and measurement and geometry through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will investigate relationships, which they will then generalize as equations of lines, and will determine the connections between different representations of a linear relation. They will also explore relationships that emerge from the measurement of three-dimensional figures and two-dimensional shapes. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Prerequisite: None

Principles of Mathematics     MPM2D

Grade 10, Academic

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relations and their applications; solve and apply linear systems; verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry; and investigate the trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Prerequisite: Principles of Mathematics, Grade 9, Academic

Foundations of Mathematics      MFM2P

Grade 10, Applied

This course enables students to consolidate their understanding of linear relations and extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and hands-on activities. Students will develop and graph equations in analytic geometry; solve and apply linear systems, using real-life examples; and explore and interpret graphs of quadratic relations. Students will investigate similar triangles, the trigonometry of right triangles, and the measurement of three-dimensional figures. Students will consolidate their mathematical skills as they solve problems and communicate their thinking.

Prerequisite: Grade 9 Mathematics, Academic or Applied

Foundations for College Mathematics   MBF3C

Grade 11, College Preparation

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of mathematics as a problem solving tool in the real world. Students will extend their understanding of quadratic relations; investigate situations involving exponential growth; solve problems involving compound interest; solve financial problems connected with vehicle ownership; develop their ability to reason by collecting, analysing, and evaluating data involving one variable; connect probability and statistics; and solve problems in geometry and trigonometry. Students will consolidate their mathematical skills as they solve problems and communicate their thinking.

Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics, Grade 10, Applied

Functions and Applications    MCF3M

Grade 11, University/College Preparation

This course introduces basic features of the function by extending students’ experiences with quadratic relations. It focuses on quadratic, trigonometric, and exponential functions and their use in modelling real-world situations. Students will represent functions numerically, graphically, and algebraically; simplify expressions; solve equations; and solve problems relating to applications. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Prerequisite: Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10, Academic, or Foundations of

Mathematics, Grade 10, Applied

Functions    MCR3U

Grade 11, University Preparation

This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically, and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse functions; and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Prerequisite: Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10, Academic

Advanced Functions    MHF4U

Grade 12, University Preparation

This course extends students’ experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; develop techniques for combining functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended both for students taking the Calculus and Vectors course as a prerequisite for a university program and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs.

Prerequisite: Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation

Calculus and Vectors     MCV4U

Grade 12, University Preparation

This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields such as science, engineering, economics, and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university-level calculus, linear algebra, or physics course.

Note: The new Advanced Functions course (MHF4U) must be taken prior to or concurrently with Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U)

Mathematics of Data Management     MDM4U

Grade 12, University Preparation

This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analysing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences, and the humanities will find this course of particular interest.

Prerequisite: Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation, or Functions and Applications, Grade 11, University/College Preparation

Course Descriptions for Health and Physical Education

Healthy Active Living Education  PPL1O

Grade 9, Open

This course emphasizes regular participation in a variety of enjoyable physical activities that promote lifelong healthy active living. Students will learn movement skills and principles, ways to improve personal fitness and physical competence, and safety and injury prevention. They will investigate issues related to healthy sexuality and the use and abuse of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs, and will participate in activities designed to develop goal-setting, communication, and social skills.

Prerequisite: None

Healthy Active Living Education  PPL2O

Grade 10, Open

This course emphasizes regular participation in a variety of enjoyable physical activities that promote lifelong healthy active living. Student learning will include the application of movement principles to refine skills; participation in a variety of activities that enhance personal competence, fitness, and health; examination of issues related to healthy sexuality, healthy eating, substance use and abuse; and the use of informed decision-making, conflict resolution, and social skills in making personal choices.

Prerequisite: None

Healthy Active Living Education   PPL3O

Grade 11, Open

This course focuses on the development of a healthy lifestyle and participation in a variety of enjoyable physical activities that have the potential to engage students’ interest throughout their lives. Students will be encouraged to develop personal competence in a variety of movement skills and will be given opportunities to practise goal-setting, decision-making, social, and interpersonal skills. Students will also study the components of healthy relationships, reproductive health, mental health, and personal safety.

Prerequisite: None

Exercise Science  PSE4U

Grade 12, University Preparation

This course focuses on the study of human movement and of systems, factors, and principles involved in human development. Students will learn about the effects of physical activity on health and performance, the evolution of physical activity and sports, and the factors that influence an individual’s participation in physical activity. The course prepares students for university programs in physical education, kinesiology, recreation, and sports administration.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 university or university/college preparation course in science, or any Grade 11 or 12 open course in health and physical education

Course Descriptions for Science

Science   SNC1P

Grade 9, Applied

This course enables students to develop their understanding of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and to apply their knowledge of science to everyday situations. They are also given opportunities to develop practical skills related to scientific investigation. Students will plan and conduct investigations into practical problems and issues related to the impact of human activity on ecosystems; the structure and properties of elements and compounds; space exploration and the components of the universe; and static and current electricity.

Prerequisite: None

Science    SNC1D

Grade 9, Academic

This course enables students to develop their understanding of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and to relate science to technology, society, and the environment. Throughout the course, students will develop their skills in the processes of scientific investigation. Students will acquire an understanding of scientific theories and conduct investigations related to sustainable ecosystems; atomic and molecular structures and the properties of elements and compounds; the study of the universe and its properties and components; and the principles of electricity.

Prerequisite: None

Science   SNC2D

Grade 10, Academic

This course enables students to enhance their understanding of concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and of the interrelationships between science, technology, society, and the environment. Students are also given opportunities to further develop their scientific investigation skills. Students will plan and conduct investigations and develop their understanding of scientific theories related to the connections between cells and systems in animals and plants; chemical reactions, with a particular focus on acid-base reactions; forces that affect climate and climate change; and the interaction of light and matter.

Prerequisite: Science, Grade 9, Academic or Applied

Science   SNC2P

Grade 10, Applied

This course enables students to develop a deeper understanding of concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and to apply their knowledge of science in real-world situations. Students are given opportunities to develop further practical skills in scientific investigation. Students will plan and conduct investigations into everyday problems and issues related to human cells and body systems; chemical reactions; factors affecting climate change; and the interaction of light and matter.

Prerequisite: Grade 9 Science, Academic or Applied

Environmental Science  SVN3M

Grade 11, University/College Preparation  

This course provides students with the fundamental knowledge of and skills relating to environmental science that will help them succeed in life after secondary school. Students will explore a range of topics, including the role of science in addressing contemporary environmental challenges; the impact of the environment on human health; sustainable agriculture and forestry; the reduction and management of waste; and the conversation of energy. Students will increase their scientific and environmental literacy and examine the interrelationships between science, the environment, and society in a variety of areas.

Prerequisite: Grade 10 Science, Academic or Applied

 

Biology   SBI3U

Grade 11, University Preparation

This course furthers students’ understanding of the processes involved in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biodiversity; evolution; genetic processes; the structure and function of animals; and the anatomy, growth, and function of plants. The course focuses on the theoretical aspects of the topics under study, and helps students refine skills related to scientific investigation.

Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic

Biology   SBI4U

Grade 12, University Preparation

This course provides students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the concepts and processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biochemistry, metabolic process, molecular genetics, homeostasis, and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on achievement of the detailed knowledge and the refinement of skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related fields.

Prerequisite: Biology, Grade 11, University Preparation

Chemistry   SCH3U

Grade 11, University Preparation

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds; chemical reactions and quantitative relationships in those reactions; solutions and solubility; and atmospheric chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment.

Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic

Chemistry  SCH4U

Grade 12, University Preparation

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, equilibrium in chemical systems, and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and will refine their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment.

Prerequisite: Chemistry, Grade 11, University Preparation

Physics  SPH3U

Grade 11, University Preparation

This course develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students will explore kinematics, with an emphasis on linear motion; different kinds of forces; energy transformations; the properties of mechanical waves and sound; and electricity and magnetism. They will enhance their scientific investigation skills as they test laws of physics. In addition, they will analyse the interrelationships between physics and technology, and consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic

Physics   SPH4U

Grade 12, University Preparation

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that affect motion, and will investigate electrical, gravitational, and magnetic fields and electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum mechanics, and special relativity. They will further develop their scientific investigation skills, learning, for example, how to analyse, qualitatively and quantitatively, data related to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

Prerequisite: Physics, Grade 11, University Preparation

Courses in Technological Education

Communications Technology   TGJ3M

Grade 11, University/College Preparation

This course examines communications technology from a media perspective. Students will develop knowledge and skills as they design and produce media projects in the areas of live, recorded, and graphic communications. These areas may include TV, video, and movie production; radio and audio production; print and graphic communications; photography; digital imaging; broadcast journalism; and interactive new media. Students will also develop an awareness of related environmental and societal issues, and will explore college and university programs and career opportunities in the various communications technology fields.

Prerequisite: None

Communications Technology  TGJ4M

Grade 12, University/College Preparation

This course enables students to further develop media knowledge and skills while designing and producing projects in the areas of live, recorded, and graphic communications. Students may work in the areas of TV, video and movie production; radio and audio production; print and graphic communications; photography; digital imaging; broadcast journalism; and interactive new media. Students will also expand their awareness of environmental and societal issues related to communications technology, and will investigate career opportunities and challenges in a rapidly changing technological environment.

Prerequisite: Communications Technology, Grade 11, University/College Preparation

Hospitality and Tourism  TFJ3C

Grade 11, College

This course enables students to develop or expand knowledge and skills related to hospitality and tourism, as reflected in the various sectors of the tourism industry. Students will learn about preparing and presenting food, evaluating facilities, controlling inventory, and marketing and managing events and activities, and will investigate customer service principles and the cultural and economic forces that drive tourism trends. Students will develop an awareness of health and safety standards, environmental and societal issues, and career opportunities in the tourism industry.

Prerequisite: None

Hospitality and Tourism   TFJ4C

Grade 12, College

This course enables students to further develop knowledge and skills related to the various sectors of the tourism industry. Students will demonstrate advanced food preparation and presentation skills; increase health and wellness knowledge; develop tourism administration and management skills; design and implement a variety of events or activities; and investigate principles and procedures that contribute to high-quality customer service. Students will expand their awareness of health and safety issues, environmental and societal issues, and career opportunities in the tourism industry.

Prerequisite: Hospitality and Tourism, Grade 11, College Preparation